Drumnadrochit Holiday Part 1: Kintail munros and the Caledonian Canal

Day 2: Carn Ghluasaid, Sgurr nan Conbhairean & Sail Chaorainn

Day 1 was a day of ‘nothing’ really. The original plan was that Bruce would meet me in Inverness on Friday evening having done another couple of Skye munros. The reality was that he went to work and we went up together as their Skye guide had cancelled the walk, the horrible rain and wind of Friday continuing into Saturday and putting paid to the first day’s walking. On the upside, we had a leisurely day and rested for once!

You can therefore imagine our delight to wake up to a dry morning with low cloud, no rain, and a forecast suggesting the sun would break through later in the day. A hearty breakfast at our B & B, Greenlea, following a solid night’s sleep set us up for the day ahead.

Despite my lack of appreciation at times for Bruce’s forward planning (usually when he’s talking hills late of a weekday evening when all I want to do is get to bed), he pulled an ace today! Having read the route guides and studied the maps carefully he had chosen a route that had good paths and would avoid water crossings, ideal for a day when the steams could be in spate.

Heading out, the parking area at Lundie was easily found and we then had a clear path, following the old military road, to begin our climb. This route quickly turned off onto a very good hill path which led us all the way up to Carn Ghluasaid. Despite the rain this was relatively dry and towards the top there was little evidence of yesterday’s downpours at all as the path zig-zagged and pulled us upwards at a good steady pace. The weather was stunning and it was one of those days where you truly appreciate being outdoors. The scenery all around was beautiful with the hills of Kintail opening up an amazing panorama. It really doesn’t get better than this!

Despite the sunny day, as we’d approached the summit it clouded over a little and it was amazing how quickly we chilled on stopping. Extra layers and more gloves were added and after a quick snack stop we were raring to go again and slowly warmed up.

The second munro, shrouded in cloud, was somewhat intimidating from the distance as is often the case (or so Bruce reminded me). We made good time on the descent to the bealach and before long we were making our ascent towards the second summit of the day, Sgurr nan Conbhairean. Ahead of us we could see another walker and meeting him at the impressive summit cairn we enjoyed a good chat over another snack break. Always great to chat and talk hills, we headed off ahead of him knowing our paths would probably cross later.

Sail Chaorainn

Sgurr nan Conbhairean was rather impressive from the far side with a short steep descent to the bealach and yet more impressive views to the surrounding hills.

Coming off Sgurr nan Conbhairean

It’s funny how distances can be skewed when out in the hills. The third munro of the day appeared a fair hike away but we covered ground quickly and reached the final short pull up to Sail Chaorainn. It was hard to comprehend that this was a munro being quite indistict with a tiny cairn marking the highest point. As this first cairn marks the highest point we decided against continuing to the furthest cairn. Bruce then wondered whether he’ll live to regret this decision – should they remeasure the tops at any point there’s only a metre between them! Not an issue for me as I’ve always said I’ve no intention of completing; I also argued that as of the date we summitted this was the true top.

Sail Chaorainn, the third summit of the day, an easy walk

To descend we had to retrace our steps and head back towards Sgurr nan Conbhairean. Mistakenly, I remembered the small cairn indicating the path off to descend the ridge was within easy reach. While it wasn’t too far I was somewhat disappointed to realise that I had to reascend a fair way first, only missing the last pull back up to the second munro.

Walking back from Sail Chaorainn, view towards Sgurr nan Conbhairean

The descent took us along a ridge, again offering views of the layers of hills around us. This made for an initial easy descent before becoming rougher and steeper further down. The light was spectacular however, with the sun highlighting the tops and truly showing the summits at their best with the beautiful autumn colour all around.

Towards the end of the walk, Carn Ghluasaid, Sgurr nan Conbhairean & Sail Chaorainn in the bag

The one water crossing of the day, Allt Coire nan Clach, was thankfully easy as were the further small streams. The ground got boggy as we descended and it was with relief that we saw the transmitter mast, knowing that the car park was very close by.

The day ended well, a wee jaunt along the road taking us to the Cluanie Inn where we once again rendezvoused with our fellow walker from the second top, enjoying yet more hill chat and a very well earned supper!

Fish & chips at the Clunaie Inn

Day 3: Spidean Mialach & Gleouraich

Another dry day forecast, we decided to tackle Spidean Mialach and Gleouraich, hoping that the fog and heavy cloud might lift from the tops to afford the stunning views to the surrounding munros and the currently untouched (for us) Knoydart. The thinking was that even if we didn’t get views from the tops, we’d hopefully get some views on the way down. As the photos (kindly shared by @AbBruce) will show, once again the mountain weather went in our favour and we had an amazing day out!

The road out to these munros was single track with passing places. My concern that I wouldn’t be able to find the parking spot due to a lack of features on the map were unfounded (thanks Garmin eTrex) and we were soon headed up the path. Going was good despite being a little boggy underfoot. It was a pleasant surprise to find that although the stalkers path petered our slightly there was still a muddy track to follow. As we gained height the views below were stunning and this made the effort worthwhile!

Heading up to Spidean Mialach

Summits around could be seen in cloud, but there were also occasional breaks. We continued our upward slog, gaining height at a decent rate, and passing another couple along the way. The wind picked up a little; just stopping to chat alongside this and the cloud coming over was enough to chill me quickly. Several layers were added at this point to keep my bodyheat up.

Reaching the summit we found a cairn on the edge of the cliffs. Poles were left outside the cairn due to my clumsiness; you really wouldn’t want to trip on the way out! An ideal lunch spot, the cairn provided us with shelter and as we sat the cloud cleared and the views opened up to reveal the South Glenshiel Ridge opposite.

Continuing onwards we had a fine ridge to cross which revealed the path up to Creag Coire na Fiar Bhealaich. This for me was extremely intimidating! All I could see was a bit of a path going upwards with what appeared to be steep rocky drops on both sides. Bruce was thankfully in his best carer / mountain guide mode, and offered words of reassurance and a reminder I’ve conquered worse than this before. He even offered to carry a pole for me to hold should I wish to be lead. It turns out he was right (on this occasion; there have also been others!) There was a pretty good path once we got going and I have done more challenging hills than this! Had I been alone I’d probably have bailed and would have missed the amazing views!

Looking towards Gleouraich

The summit of Gleouraich was reached after another brief descent and ascent, and with the sun still out this provided the perfect spot to take in the views again. Truly spectacular I could have sat there all day!

Summit of Gleouraich

Dragging ourselves away, we descended via a good stalkers path again which was mercifully dry. Quads felt suitably mashed after yesterday’s endeavours and it was a delight to finally see the car.

A fabulous day out, even better than yesterday!

Day 4: Fort Augustus and Drumnadrochit

Yesterday I tweeted that the day couldn’t get much better. I was wrong! Today we went to Fort Augustus as the hill forecast was too windy to get out with much pleasure being such that it would impede our movement. Our plan had been to go for a walk around Fort Augustus, but having popped into the Caledonian Canal Visitor Centre I had to have a peek to see if there were any boats coming through the locks before I could leave.

How excited was I? Rosie & Jim’s barge (officially known as part of the Caledonian Discovery fleet) was coming!

Fort Augustus: Rosie & Jim’s barge approaches the locks on the Caledonian Canal (Caledonian Cruises)

We spent quite a while watching the barge (and a smaller boat) go through all the locks. Thanks to Bruce for allowing me the time to do this. He’d probably just have watched one gate had he been alone! When the barge finally sailed through the final lock complete with the road opening up, we headed for a cuppa, morning successfully passed!

Afternoon, following yet another power nap in the car (me, not him – this is why he drives longer distances), we had a wee jaunt around Drumnadrochit. Heading for Craigmonie woodland we both agreed that a woodland walk can be quite pleasurable, just not 70 miles of it, which was the feeling we had when we walked the Great Glen Way.

The autumnal trees were beautiful with their changing colours and the silver birches were lit up in the afternoon sunshine. A couple of lovely viewpoints showed us the local villages of Milton and Drumnadrochit.

Continuing on we took a minor road to walk up to the Falls of Divach, the only regret being that we couldn’t get up close for photos due to the fence and the drop; that and my refusal to get onto Bruce’s shoulders to take a photo!!

Falls of Divach

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