First Hill of 2020: Pressendye

The original plan for the first hill of the year was to head out on New Year’s Day. However, best laid plans and all that …

The reality of NYD was that we stayed out later than planned on Hogmanay, and when the 8 am alarm clock sounded I felt way too tired to get up. The resulting effect? Waking at 10:55 am, thus missing both the best part of a beautiful hill walking day and the opportunity to do parkrun. A walk along the golf course it was then.

Having not been out for a hill ‘fix’ since Christmas, one of us needed to get out today – it wasn’t me, although I’m glad that we did. The days are all merging into one at present and before I know it we’ll be back to the daily grind.

Due to a very blustery forecast with fog on the high tops we opted for Pressendye, a Graham that’s accessed from Tarland. We’ve done this before and I’ve blogged about it before so I’ll not go into too much detail.

Starting the walk in the main square, it’s a brisk walk along the road for the first wee while before the slog of the day begins, slowly ascending up through the fields and trees.

Pressendye: the first of the gates

Through a few gates – these were sent to try us, and were likened to a Krypton Factor Challenge – we reached the very broad ridge. This was where the wind really picked up and we were glad to be going in the ‘right’ direction, the wind at our backs. Reaching the large windshelter cairn at the summit was a welcome relief and gave a great spot to stop and have some lunch, very much protected from the wind that was howling around us.

Down we then went, dropping out of the wind pretty quickly, following good tracks along the way.

Very randomly, we bumped into a friend of the husband – small world!! After a chat with them we continued, finally descending through the lovely avenue of tall trees.

Tree lined ‘avenue’, Pressendye, Tarland

Coming out just as you approach Tarland from the Aberdeen side there were some very impressive bails, a bail ‘castle’, and a huge white plastic wrapped thing that looked like an enormous slug! Google’s a great thing: I’ve now learned that this is silage wrapped in a Budissa Bag. There are even YouTube videos showing the process, so if you’re bored (or a geek like me) have a watch! I’m well impressed- easy pleased!

Back in Tarland we stopped at Angie’s Cafe for a bacon butty and tea. A perfect end to the first day in the hills. Here’s to many more!

Looking back up to Pressendye

Reflections on 2019: Dreams, Goals and Injury

Goals (and Dreams)

This year I set myself 2 goals:

A marathon PB and a 1st club standard.

I achieved one of them.

A dream came true when I ran the London Marathon, loving every minute of it (despite prior nerves that it might just all be too much).

The plan thereafter had been to recover and then have a strong Autumn season, hopefully chasing down the coveted club standard. Sadly it didn’t happen due to injury, but I did have a rather awesome summer prior to that running the Fife Coastal Path.

We managed a few hills together (and Bruce did quite a few solo) before embarking on the West Highland Way as a wee ‘rest’ in October.

Injuries

Finally after a few months of very little or no running (a whole 10 weeks off) I had my own Christmas miracle in the form of a cortisone injection and, touch wood, will continue running pain free into the new year. I’m four runs in and it’s feeling good so far.

New Goals

There’s a lot of fitness to build back up. For now, I’m loving being able to run once again and enjoying it for what it is. My GFA for London 2020 has been deferred and my goal is to get back to consistent mileage before targeting times.

First up, my parkrun goals: 200 separate volunteer days and 200 parkruns; in that order.

Happy New Year

Here’s hoping that 2020 brings you the opportunity to pursue you dreams and just enough challenge to keep it interesting!

Merry Christmas!

What a stunning winter’s day for a Christmas walk! We decided to take full advantage, heading up Lochnagar.

White Christmas

When we were out this way a couple of weeks ago it looked like there was a fair covering of snow; not so much today. The path at car park level was clear, but once ascending through the trees it got a bit icy underfoot. This was a nuisance as we progressed further as it wasn’t clear until stepping on the boulders whether they’d be icy or not. Thankfully none of us came a cropper despite a couple of near misses!

Christmas Tidings

I was amazed by the number of people we met on the hill today. Everyone was in good cheer, exchanging Christmas joy and chat. The memorable exchange of the day was with four gents, one of whom had come from Milan to enjoy Christmas in Scotland with his hill walking friends (met when doing the Coast to Coast). He told us that God was happy for us to be on the hills today, rather than in church, hence the beautiful day.

Kahtoola Microspikes

When the ‘proper’ ice came it was a pleasure to don the microspikes, finally gaining some confidence and traction. These really are an outstanding piece of kit, perfect for times when there’s not enough for a crampon but boots just aren’t cutting it. They stayed on from hereon in until we came off the snow at the other side.

Winter Sun

The low sun was lovely, warming up the chilly day and making it a truly wonderful day to be out. Onto the proper snow, the slow pull up began. We stopped off overlooking the loch, enjoying some soup and a wee rest.

The Ladder

Up the ladder we went, following the footsteps of many others. As we continued we moved into the mist; sadly it didn’t clear until we’d come off the top.

Christmas Lunch

Reaching the summit we posed for a picture before sheltering from what little breeze there was, joining another three walkers, then being joined by another couple. Throw in a few more scattered around and quite the gathering there was!

Glas Allt

Rather than retracing our steps, we opted for a circular walk, heading down via Glas Allt Falls. As with the route up, it was excellent with the spikes on, not so good when there wasn’t sufficient coverage, again running the risk of slipping on the rock. This slowed me down significantly as the last thing I wanted for Christmas was a fall.

Loch Muick

Completing the descent, we reached the path alongside Loch Muick and made good time, yomping back to the car park. A truly wonderful Christmas walk, we were very much in our happy place!

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Merry Christmas

Hope you’ve all had a wonderful day however you’ve chosen to spend it!

Creag nan Gabhar and Loch Callater

Having bailed earlier than I’d intended on my work’s Christmas ‘do’, I was home and bedded way before pumpkin time, thus waking bright eyed and bushy tailed (or as close to that as I ever get!), and happy enough to hear that golf (his) was off as the course would be on winter greens. Winter greens = no eclectic competition and playing off mats, so I’m reliably informed there’s not much point. Thus the decision was made that I’d accompany him on Plan B, a trip to the hills.

Rucksack packed, breakfast thrown down my throat, showered and out within the hour, I was pretty impressed by myself.

Out the road we went, spotting the hill tops appearing further out towards Ballater, and discussion was had about where to head. We opted for Braemar as the skies were looking clear, a positive contrast to the forecast of foggy tops, and came upon a light dusting of snow on the roadside from around Crathie. Passing the snowgates at Braemar, the road suggested there had been snow this morning. Thankfully we didn’t have to go much further.

Parking up, it took about 10 minutes to get winter ready. Ice axe fastened to the rucksack, winter boots on (and off – too loose – and on again), waterproofs and gaiters on. It was pretty chilly feeling, even with my 4 layers on top and 2 pairs of gloves! Thankfully this feeling didn’t last once I was moving.

Heading along the track towards Loch Callater, we walked for just over a mile before heading up onto the ridge that meanders along and up to Creag nan Gabhar. I became significantly warmer as we headed upwards but in time the wind picked up and the temperature did feel cooler due to the wind chill.

The snow higher up was patchy with tiny drifts on the path, the heather still peeping through in most places, although there were some deeper sections here and there.

We opted to skirt around Creag nan Gabhar, nearly at the top, as the wind was quite strong, the snow blowing across us and the chill biting our faces. We took a wee cross country diversion here, making our own way down towards the main path.

Heading down from Creag nan Gabhar

Ahead, we saw another couple who appeared to be going a very different direction. Talking to them later, they’d avoided a more icy section by taking a detour. Meanwhile, we opted to practise our ice axe arrests, sliding down a steeper, more compacted section on our fronts and using the ice axe to slow down and stop repeatedly. It was rather good fun and definitely a good place to practise, safe in the knowledge that we weren’t going anywhere dangerous. The only unpleasant part was when my jacket rode up – I’m sure I could feel the coldness of the snow through my many layers!

Continuing downwards we finally reached the track and stopped for a bite to eat with the other couple. My soup was very tasty, and having learned from last time I found that shaking the flask before each serving meant I never got to the point of needing to eat it by the handful! There’s nothing like homemade soup for being a meal in itself!

The wee cairn marking the path down to the bridge was either missed or missing – not sure which. Again, we moved cross country with the notion of where we wanted to go from previous experience. Skies were clear so we didn’t bother taking a bearing knowing we’d happen upon the bridge soon. This bridge isn’t visible from the path and on previous occasions we have wondered if we’ve missed it, suddenly stumbling upon it.

Safely across, we wandered a little further before reaching Loch Callater, not yet frozen for the winter. Another stop was had outside the Bothy, another snack. This Bothy is really well maintained and very comfortable with composting toilets on site. Well worth a visit.

Back along the track, it’s about 3 miles to the car park. This was easy walking with just the odd patch of ice today, most of it covered by a thin dusting of snow. Last stop of the day, The Bothy in Braemar for a well deserved coffee and cake.

There’s Always Hope

I’m now on my 9th week of no running and am desperate to get back out there! For a few weeks I enjoyed being at home, having full evenings and being a couch potato. However, being so used to exercise this wore thin pretty quickly! Despite my good intentions, I haven’t been out walking as much as I might have. Walking the streets on dark evenings doesn’t hold much appeal. However, over the last couple of weeks I have tried to make more of an effort to do some exercise with a combination of metabolic and weight workouts, and the odd walk, hoping to preserve some small modicum of fitness, and also serving to lift my mood.

I’ve been extremely grateful to have parkrun throughout this period of injury, enabling me to keep in touch with my running friends and maintaining the desire to get back out there. I thoroughly enjoyed my role as Tail Walker at Crathes parkrun, a beautiful woodland course and was delighted to have someone walk with me in addition to my husband who did his first ever parkrun, albeit without crossing the finish line as he doesn’t have a barcode. Today, I walked Hazlehead parkrun, choosing it over the Aberdeen parkrun, as I love the trails there and felt it would be a more enjoyable walk.

Interestingly, when I’m Run Director I’m genuinely happy for anyone to come along. It honestly doesn’t matter how slow (or fast) you are, so it was strange that today when I arrived I felt some trepidation around walking. Would the volunteers have to wait just for me? Would anyone else be walking? With parkrun having renamed the ‘Tail Runner’ as ‘Tail Walker’,  and being very aware of the whole ethos of the event, it was unsettling that I still had this concern.

Briefing at Hazlehead parkrun

That aside, it was lovely to be at Hazlehead for a change, and a boost to see familiar faces, some of whom I saw just yesterday (a work colleague) and others that I’ve not seen for a wee while. Willie, the Run Director, gave his briefing before I made my way to the back of the field. I was happy to find that I was not alone there and I had company and a blether for the first mile. After this, I was alone, my companion having passed her baby over to her mum returned heading towards ‘home’, running on the rest of the way alone,  and I picked up the pace to enjoy a brisk walk. Here I saw my friend, Hilary, on return, up visiting Aberdeen for the weekend, another lovely surprise.

At the turn I was greeted by a friendly marshal who asked if I was a Run Director from the beach – I am. Then I enjoyed the morning sunshine, again passing along the top of the golf course, and passing the tail walkers who were enjoying their morning sortie, comfortingly in no great rush.

Tail walkers at Hazlehead parkrun

Heading back towards the park, the temptation to run was just too much, so I opted for a strategy of one minute run, one minute walk, probably looking somewhat ridiculous to the morning dog walkers, dressed in my hill walking trousers and down jacket. It was a great feeling though and I lived in hope that I wouldn’t suffer too much later as a result. Finishing, I was greeted by the familiar faces of Hazlehead Run Directors, Tony and Willie, and enjoyed a good chat with on an interesting array of topics! I promised I wouldn’t disclose any further.

Thank you volunteers at Hazleheaed parkrun

Looking ahead, the underwater treadmill at Total Endurance beckons on Tuesday. I’m very excited to be trying this out for the first time. This was very generously gifted to me by a running friend who thought my need was greater than hers. The kindness of the running community over these last weeks has been truly amazing and so appreciated, with folks giving encouragement, friendly messages and offers of support on the road back from injury. Thank you all!

I’m really hoping that I’m coming out the other side soon. My sore foot has now been x-rayed and the good news is there does not appear to be anything really nasty going on. A bone spur seems to be at the root of the problem, creating severe inflammation. With any luck, an injection next week may provide the cure, as I’m told that my feet are flexible and in pretty good shape otherwise.

Wish me luck! Any tips on returning to running gratefully received!

Mayar and The Pied Piper of Corrie Fee

Fed up with being stuck indoors – the foot injury niggles on, but that’s a whole other story – we decided to head out and into the hills to see some of winter. Various options on offer, we decided to go big and head for the Angus munros, Mayar and Driesh.

Glen Doll Visitor Centre

Parking at Glen Doll, we availed ourselves of the facilities at the Visitor Centre before heading on our way. It’s amazing how much longer it takes to get ready for a winter walk, faffing around with winter boots, out for the first time this season, a bigger rucksack to carry, gloves on from the off, and of course the obligatory ice axe along with hope that you’ll not be required to use it!

I was a little (or a lot, depending who you ask!) grumpy as we began our walk. Grumbling about my feet feeling sore (I think they need sorted out post West Highland Way), being too hot, and any other number of things, I was a sheer joy to walk with, so much so that it was even suggested at one point we should return to the car and do our own thing! I was assured when my mood lightened a little that I’d be happier on reaching …

Corrie Fee

I don’t often remember the hills that I’ve walked, more remembering the people that we meet. I did remember being very impressed the first time we did these munros, around 6 years ago, by the beauty of Corrie Fee. A glacial corrie, in summer it was lush and green. Today the colours were muted but the landscape was beautiful nonetheless with a dusting of snow to highlight the impressive bowl formation.

We followed the path through the corrie, gently undulating along the way. It never ceases to amaze that ice could have such an impact on the landscape and very much reinforces the small part that each of us plays in a much bigger universe.

As we started to ascend, the odd bits of slush and snow began to get a little more icy. This didn’t thrill me. Snow is good, hard packed snow and a crampon is even better. Not sure whether you’re going to slip on ice or stand on dry rock is never great.

However, this was swiftly forgotten as ahead was intrigue! A piper? Surely not!

The Pied Piper of Corrie Fee (aka Glen Kelly Bagpiper)

I do love to hear the bagpipes and have loved being piped up a hill during a race. Never before have I ever seen a piper randomly standing halfway up a hillside. Bruce, as intrigued as I, reached him and his merry band first, enquiring as to what they were up to. It transpires they were shooting an advert for Dundee Gin! A real class effort. Glen was even persuaded (it didn’t take much) to play us a tune. A lovely young man, should you need a bagpiper for any occasion, look Glen Kelly Bagpiper up on Facebook.

Sadly, nobody was persuaded to let me sample the Dundee Gin, despite my best efforts! It’s now on my hit list of things to try.

Onwards and Upwards

Leaving Glen and his wee entourage, we continued up heading into the mist as we moved onto the plateau. This was a more gentle ascent and the snow proper had begun, the snow line being around 700 metres.

Everything looked the same with the sky and snow almost merging into one. Before long we were at the summit cairn. Here we enjoyed the company of three other walkers and their dog, taking time to admire the views. It was a decent day at this point and despite the cold air I was still surprisingly warm.

As someone who suffers from Raynauds, I tend to chill very quickly. True winter conditions have yet to arrive – my down jacket, additional mid layer and several extra pairs of gloves remained firmly in the rucksack!

Driesh in the Fog

Initially it looked promising, the sun shining low through the clouds. Sadly this didn’t last too long.

The footprints of those that had gone before us led the way, as did the fence posts that we encountered further along as we made our way towards Driesh. With the mist low it was good to have these clear signs in addition to the map as visibility was not the best ever.

Approaching the bealach that we had to slightly descend to in order to summit Driesh we chatted to some younger folks enjoying lunch on the rocks. The fog enclosed the hill further still and the folks with the dog we’d been behind drifted in and out of visibility as they began their ascent, the top of the hill now very firmly enshrouded in thick cloud.

The Big Question

Bruce asked the question: continue in order to see nothing or head down? This was a revelation for him. I’ve decided on prior occasions not to bother with a summit, being too tired or conditions not being great. I’ve said all along I’m not ‘bagging’ munros. He, meanwhile, is, and has not done this (except in atrocious winter conditions when I’ve not been stupid enough to leave the sofa in the first place), and so it was a very novel concept for him, realising that he’s already ‘bagged’ this munro he didn’t need to bother.

Hence we found ourselves heading homeward, back to the car.

Following the Deer Fence

Unsure quite where the path was, but knowing we were there or thereabouts, I suggested we follow the deer fence (and footsteps of others) rather than heading lower which appeared to be steep and potentially off the face of the hill.

This provided a clear route; checking the map partway with a Garmin bearing we definitely had steep contours dropping off at either side. Continuing on we began to descend, Bruce then throwing himself full length just for fun – he tripped over an old fence wire in the snow.

Further down the slushy snow was frustrating. Slippery and very patchy, it resulted in me hopping between grassy tufts and muttering discontentedly. As we reached the bottom of this initial descent we could clearly see the path along the hillside. Conditions on this path I suspect may have been similar to the slushy stuff we’d just crossed so I was happy enough that we’d missed it higher up.

Back to the Forest

Descending still, we reached slush free ground and finally the forest. Somewhat decimated by forestry works this provided a clear route back.

Highlight of the Day

Most definitely Glen Kelly and his bagpipes. I might even put a Tripadvisor review on about this wonderful attraction to see how long it is before the first complaint that he wasn’t there!!

West Highland Way Adventures: The Last Chapter

Day 5: Bridge of Orchy to Kinlochleven

Awoke feeling very refreshed after a great night’s sleep at Tigh na Fraoch. Whenever we stay in Tyndrum (which we do fairly regularly to access the hills) this is our accommodation of choice. Heather, a lovely host, really makes it feel like coming ‘home’. It was good to catch up on Heather’s news last night – as a fellow runner there are always tales to trade over a cuppa! An early breakfast allowed a relaxed start to the day.

We were collected by taxi and taken back to Bridge of Orchy where we were deposited at the start of the Way. Unsure of the weather with rain showers forecast, we’d opted for base layers and jackets. Heading uphill to begin we quickly warmed up.

Bridge of Orchy from the West Highland Way

The first rain shower came, the waterproof trousers went on. I quickly overheated – I always find that no matter how ‘good’ my waterproofs are, I very quickly feel like I’m being boiled in the bag! The waterproofs came off. Another rain shower came, blowing in from behind. The waterproofs went on.

Loch Tulla, West Highland Way

At this point a decision was made – the waterproofs stay on until Kingshouse, hot or otherwise, and venting legs/pit zips would just have to suffice for cooling.

The path across Rannoch Moor is good. Showers blew through from time to time, usually very short lived, and the sun shone through occasionally. A rainbow appeared on the horizon and stayed with us for much of the way.

The breeze picked up as we progressed and the wind chill was at times considerable. As we headed down towards Kingshouse the wind direction appeared to change and it was particularly biting. I could now appreciate that the forecast of snow in Orchy tonight may not just be a figment of the forecaster’s imagination!

Arrival at The Kingshouse Hotel was timed pretty much perfectly, just ahead of the next rain shower, this time more prolonged – no bad thing as this meant Bruce was happy to sit for more than 5 minutes. We enjoyed a very leisurely lunch in the refurbished and very much upgraded restaurant, enjoying watching the progress of the rain and the deer running around outside through the huge panoramic windows. The cheese on toast was pretty amazing (as was Bruce’s soup).

West Highland Way, Kingshouse to Kinlochleven

Refreshed, and having seen the rain clouds having pretty much passed over, we readied ourselves for venturing out again. Waterproofs on, initially it felt very chilly. This was purely due to the warmth of the hotel, and by the time we’d made our way to the foot of the Devil’s Staircase we were ready yet again to get rid of the layers.

Again, we timed it to perfection! The sun broke through on our way along the path and we were free from the constraints of waterproofs for the slow, steady climb up the ‘staircase’, a blessed relief as it takes quite some time to reach the top and a fair heat is built up! At the top again the rain came on. Another shower and another quick turn for the waterproofs!

View from the Devil’s staircase heading down to Kinlochleven

I had it in my head that it was all downhill from here but I was wrong. We went down, and then we had to go up again. Up and down the undulating path went. Finally we got to the point I’d remembered where it really was all downhill to Kinlochleven.

Far better than I’d remembered, today it didn’t kill my quads. My knees weren’t screaming (and thankfully neither were his), and before we knew it we’d skipped down to the pipes. The houses by this point were tantalisingly close and suddenly we were at the back of the factory.

Delighted to have completed the longest leg of our journey, we headed straight to the local inn to celebrate before going onwards to our hotel.

Amazed (again) by how good a shower feels, we headed for dinner in the bar and enjoyed some good chat with a couple of guys who were also on the Way. Unlike us, they were camping – the ‘cheaper’ alternative. To clarify, they’d learned that it’s not really cheaper when you spend the night in the cosy bar, rather than outside in your cold tent!

Day 6: Kinlochleven to Fort William

Trying to avoid Bruce’s cold, I spent the night outdoors (or might as well have as I kept the window WIDE open to avoid germs); however, cocooning myself in the duvet gave plenty of warmth and comfort. I guess this is why mummy bags are so popular with campers!

Breakfast at the hotel was excellent – I love smoked salmon, and combine it with scrambled eggs and you’ve got a winner.

Setting off, it was up and out of Kinlochleven and I began a steady plod. Surprisingly, my legs felt pretty good again. I’ve been amazed this trip how strong I feel and how little DOMS I’ve experienced. It looks like despite cutting back on distance (not running at all for a fortnight!), the odd yoga practice and strength training have done me good.

Heading up and out of Kinlochleven on the West Highland Way

Ascent aside, it was a beautiful morning and the flurry of snow on the tops last night made for stunning views. The climb was long but we finally started to see the top of the tree line and the path levelling our ahead of us.

Leaving Kinlochleven on the West Highland Way

Climb over, the path ambles pleasantly along between the hills. This is easy walking, the only downside today being that we were heading into the wind. What a difference in conditions! Although still lovely in the sunshine, there was a real bite in the air and a wintry feel to things.

This reminds me why I’m not a great lover of winter hills – I seem to fluctuate between extremes, very hot or freezing!

Along this stretch we were caught up by a fellow walker. One of the things I love most about walking is the people you meet and, as always, it was good to exchange tales of the walk and hear someone else’s story. An interesting man, we walked quite a few miles as a group, easily passing the time.

Company on the trails, West Highland Way

Sunlight coming and going changed the colours and the landscape quite dramatically! I’ve loved the autumn tones this week, so beautiful. We’ve also been so fortunate with the weather, again only having a few very brief spots of rain today. The thought of returning to reality next week is not appealing at present. I’d happily just continue on.

The first glimpses of Ben Nevis came into view, thoroughly majestic and impressively clear. It’s a rare sight in all ways to see the Ben so clearly. It definitely looked far more picturesque with the snow covering.

Ben Nevis, Britain’s highest mountain, dusted by snow in October on a clear day

Ahead we dropped down before rising up through what was once forest. We parted ways with our walking buddy here, continuing on together. Dropping down through the trees finally with the Glen Nevis in sight, feelings were mixed. I’ve so enjoyed the walk this week and definitely need to do something like this again. Thoughts are drifting to next summer.

The road that leads from Glen Nevis to the finish of the West Highland Way is probably one of the least inspiring sections. It very much feels like a return to civilisation being back on tarmac, and not in a good way.

Back on the road, Glen Nevis round to Fort William, finishing the West Highland Way

We passed a few walkers on this final stretch, chatting briefly as we went. Coming into Fort William proper we got chatting to a couple at the ‘original’ end of the Way, ending up walking to the finish point in the town centre with them.

Photographs taken it was time to relax. Heading for the Grog & Gruel, we were joined by the couple we’d ended the Way with, shortly thereafter by the chap we’d walked with earlier. Good banter ensued and provided a great end to our adventure. Once again, the Way came up trumps proving why it’s such a special trip.

Statue at the end of the West Highland Way, Fort William

West Highland Way Adventures: Part 2

Day 3: Rowardennan to Inverarnan

Having felt like I’d not slept at all – no idea why, but I saw many hours on the clock – we set off from Rowardennan in the knowledge that this would be a tough day. The route largely hugs the lochside throughout, climbing gently up and down, over stony boulders and tree roots. Our first photo stop was just outside Rowardennan.

Leaving Balmaha and heading along Loch Lomond on the West Highland Way

The path was fairly good initially. Then the choice had to be made – low road or high road. There really is no decision: the low road hugs the lochside as far as possible, undulating according to the tree routes, erosion or terrain, while the high road follows the fire road, rejoining further along.

We met one of our fellow walkers on this part of the route and enjoyed some chat. Although the cloud was very low, the worst precipitation we encountered was a very fine drizzle. Not enough to give us any cause for concern, but just enough to play havoc with my hair! Already suffering from the change of water, I finished the day looking like I’d been dragged through a hedge backwards- several times!!

Up and down we went, small undulations, never enough to be bothersome, but sufficient to ensure care was needed to avoid tripping on roots and stones.

Loch Lomond

This continued for a number of miles until we finally reached the Inversnaid Hotel. This has been refurbished since we last visited and now has a really welcoming walkers entrance, featuring storage for rucksacks and boots with CCTV from all angles, and an area where you’re welcome to eat your own packed lunch. We opted instead for scones and coffee – a very tasty treat, and a lovely pick me up.

Leaving Inversnaid the toughest section of the Way is reached. This is due to the technicality of the terrain. It’s significantly more rooty and bouldery than the previous section, again with single track paths, and these frequently rise and fall as progress is made. There are also umpteen bridges, steps and even a ladder. It was at this ladder that Bruce dropped one of his poles while taking a photo, then having to climb down a drop to retrieve it!

When all of this was past, we came towards the Bothy at Doune. Here we saw a man looking intently at the hillside from various vantage points. I waved at him and he acknowledged me with a friendly wave, continuing searching through his binoculars. As we took photos, also taking some of our walking buddy for her to send to family in Canada, he approached and I had to enquire as to what he was looking for. (Facebook page: Doune Cottage)

Cue, the most enthusiastic discussion in some time! He’d bought a derelict house, retired from work, and made it a project to completely renovate it over the next few years. The house itself has a really interesting and colourful history, but has fallen on hard times through neglect, and it’s going to be brought back to life through a real labour of love, providing a home for years to come. The fact that the only access is across the loch or along the Way is no issue. I do look forward to following the Facebook updates and seeing how this progresses.

West Highland Way, heading towards Doune Bothy & Cottage

Inspired, we continued and headed up the end of the loch to the high point that affords stunning views all the way back. Shortly before reaching this we saw a few of the feral goats that live on the lochside including a cute little kid. If we hadn’t seen them we’d certainly have smelled them; they were rather fragrant to say the least!

Finally we made our descent into Beinglas campsite, enjoying a quick drink before embarking on the final leg of our journey.

Beinglas Farm Bar

Here we had to phone for collection to the Drovers Inn as the bridge across was taken down by flooding in August. Waiting for another couple of friends from the Way our plan was to head back together. Unfortunately on pick up it appeared our transport was oversubscribed so it was an interesting journey to say the least! Let’s just say I now know what it feels like to be a sheep!

Transport to the Drovers Inn

A fantastic evening was had in the Drovers, enjoying the company of people from the Way and others visiting the Inn as tourists.

Day 4: Inverarnan to Bridge of Orchy
We opted for an early start today for two reasons: firstly, we had a long day ahead, and secondly, there was rain forecast late afternoon and we hoped to stay ahead of it.

We met fellow walkers at breakfast and I thoroughly enjoyed my porridge; it tastes so much better when properly cooked in a pan!

The Drovers Inn, Inverarnan

A quick turnaround saw us out of our room and deposited back on the West Highland Way by 8:30 am. Deposited just at the start of the Way, we missed out a very short uphill section from Beinglas. However, we drove it last night so no great loss.

It was good to be on better terrain again. We made good time from the outset, enjoying the scenery, more able to drink in the autumn colours when not having to focus on our feet.

Ahead, we were aware that the bridge at Derrydarroch had come down during the flooding in August. This meant another diversion and we’d been advised that fording the river would be challenging due to the drop on either side.

West Highland Way, on route from Inverarnan to Tyndrum

In the event we were pleasantly surprised. A lack of rain meant that the water level was really low and crossing was easy. How the lad we’d met earlier had fallen in baffles me! Unless he’d gone straight off the ‘bridge’ at which point the water was pretty deep, but easily avoided by walking a few feet in either direction.

Missing bridge at Derrydarroch, West Highland Way

Further along, the good trails continued although sadly the evidence of the flooding also continued. As we approached a wee cottage, Bruce wondered how close the water would have come. Sadly it appears it might have gone straight through it.

The scenery continued to reward us, staying ahead of the cloud and only being subjected to a very light spot of rain on occasion. At no point did we consider putting our waterproofs on, such were the favourable conditions again.

The route, in our minds, was split into several sections, including sheep creeps under railway and road.

West Highland Way passing under the road

Following this section the path condition greatly improved with a section of newly laid track. I believe there’s been some controversy around this as it looks very manmade, but the upside for us was that it made good terrain for tired feet.

Newly laid section of trail on West Highland Way

Our next target was the wigwams at Strathfillan, plan being to stop for a coffee break. We ambled along happily, sometimes having a song or two to keep us going. Luckily we both have a shared humour as at times this got a little silly. Just as well we were on our own!

Just ahead of the farm we saw the Crianlarich munros and I was delighted that I could say I’d done them all. The wigwam shop was very welcoming and the coffee and millionaires shortbread went down a treat. As always, food in the great outdoors is the best!

Not long before this, we’d met an American couple and enjoyed some good chat as we walked. As with running, it’s amazing how quickly time passes when you’re engaging in conversation. They passed us when we were stopped at the wigwams, but we later caught them again and we walked into a Tyndrum together. The first shot was captured just ahead of Strathfillan, the second the awkward cow that refused to pose for a photo at Strathfillan itself!

A gentle walk alongside the river took us into Tyndrum through the community woodland. I love this section – some lovely trails that would be fun to run if this was your local stomping ground.

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Passing through Tyndrum we resisted the urge to stop, either to drop off our rucksacks or for coffee and cake, the fear being that we might not get going again. As we headed out we heard sirens; sadly these became frequent with multiple emergency vehicles passing by on their way to a serious road traffic accident. This led us to reflect on how fortunate we are to be on the trails, experiencing the scenery and the weather, adverse or otherwise.

Our journey ended in Bridge of Orchy with a few hours to pass ahead of the train back to Tyndrum. Fellow walkers ambled in and it was a pleasure to chat with them, exchanging stories of the trails.

Safely back in Tyndrum we’ve now eaten and have caught up with other folks from the trail. Next step, bed!

May you all travel safely wherever the road takes you.

West Highland Way Adventures: Part 1

Day 1: Milngavie to Balmaha
Starting in Milngavie, having met the friendly chap from ‘Go Haggis’ baggage carriers at the Premier Inn, we managed to successfully navigate our way out of the town centre, although not before accosting a local for the obligatory photograph.

Start of the West Highland Way, Milngavie

Heading through Mugdock Park we were among the Sunday runners and bikers. This was different to my previous recollection of the start and was very enjoyable. There were new little sculptures that caught my eye.

Mugdock Park

Continuing on we left the park behind. It was a beautiful day and as the sun rose higher in the sky we were slowly warmed up, losing the chill of the morning air. Both sun and moon were visible in the clear blue sky. Not sure my photographic attempts captured either particularly well …

The trails were in good shape, clearly posted, and good underfoot conditions saw us making decent time. We were pleasantly surprised to bump into some others who were also starting out on the Way today. Being late, end of season, and starting on a Sunday, we had wondered if we’d meet any other walkers or be driving one another insane by the end of the week!

A succession of gates led the way …

There were also some interesting signs with references to the Shire, some very colourful gardens, and we also met another couple of walkers. They were headed for the distillery as their next stop.

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Before long we reached the Beech Tree Inn. This provided a welcome break (and a cup of tea). Like true Aberdonians, we opted to sit at a table outside and consume our own snacks rather than purchase the extortionate offerings in-house. Our final pair of WHW walkers were met here.

Beech Tree Inn

On moving away from the Beech Tree, it initially appeared that this decision might have been the worst of the day. My foot felt like it had seized up and was really painful, each step hurting to bear weight. This was reminiscent of post-run feelings and I sincerely hope it wasn’t going to get worse later!

The trails were again good and after the initial discomfort we settled into a comfortable pace again.

Getting closer to Drymen we were onto minor roads and we passed a small settlement. How disappointed were we to discover that the freezer was locked! No honesty box ice lollies for us!

Honesty box before Drymen, West Highland Way

The road was brightened up by some quirky signs. Sadly the trolls appeared to be hiding today!

Finally we were in reach of Drymen. The final pull up the grassy field was made easier by the prospect of a stop ahead.

Having looked at the West Highland Way website (rather Bruce has checked and I had listened attentively) we were anticipating a diversion through Drymen. All set for a detour and opportunity to stop for a refreshing beverage, we were somewhat underwhelmed to find that the route continued without the need to pass through the village. I may have temporarily donned my grumpy pants here!

Seed planted, when we reached the forest we were on a mission to find a stop for a snack break. Having almost given up – Bruce suggested a standing break – we happened upon a clearing with a few logs. Boost! It felt amazing to sit and rest our weary legs for a bit. The opportunity to tighten my boots didn’t go amiss, and the foot felt a little calmer on setting off again.

Snack stop on West Highland Way

We began to see the first glimpses of Loch Lomond, our nemesis(?) for the next couple of days, and Conic Hill grew closer, the last pull of the day. Both looked impressive and again we remarked on how fortunate we’ve been with the weather today.

Before long we were at the foot of the hill and I’m delighted to report that the climb felt easy.

Bridge before Conic Hill, West Highland Way

We headed for the top, along with many locals out for their Sunday stroll. It was weird being in ‘civilisation’ again, some walkers looking at us like we had three heads when we said a friendly, ‘hello’. The sun was getting low, not quite setting, just low enough to ruin any chance of a good photo.

Sun beginning to set, coming off Conic Hill to Balmaha

The wind had picked up and there was a fair chill, so a quick nip and off we went, down towards Balmaha. Knowing we had enough light and feeling our legs getting weary, the pace dropped off quite significantly.

Arriving at our accommodation, The Oak Tree Inn, we were delighted to find ourselves in a beautiful annexe (Corrie Vern) a couple of doors along. Very cosy and luxurious, all the more so for having mistaken the receptionist initially when we thought she said we were staying in a caravan!!

A decent meal set us up for the night and we headed for an early bed, shattered after a long day. Outside, we enjoyed some good banter with a couple of kayakers, all set to conquer the islands on the loch in the morning. We were chatting about our plans, Ben Lomond being on the cards if the weather was good, Plan B being to sit in the bar at Rowardennan. These guys shared that their Plan B was to go home!

Day 2: Balmaha to Rowardennan
A great sleep saw us raring to go again, and while I was finishing getting ready for the day Bruce was out taking some early morning photos. A good breakfast – the best porridge I’ve had in a long time – sated my appetite and fuelled me well for the day ahead.

Our day on the Way was short, purposefully planned, to allow time for Ben Lomond. The weather had come up trumps, with low cloud that would hopefully burn off as the day progressed. A stunning start to the day.

From the outset, the route followed the edge of the loch or even the beach itself.

The path continued to hug the lochside, sometimes heading through the beautiful autumnal trees, at other times furnishing is with more open views.

Further on we climbed gently and there was a fair bit of gentle undulation throughout the day.

Undulations on the West Highland Way, Balmaha to Rowardennan

It was exciting to see Ben Lomond appearing on the horizon, although at one point I was less than enthusiastic at the prospect of going up, my legs feeling a little tired. I may even have been a little ratty! (I know you probably won’t believe this, although I’m sure my Mum and Dad will!)

We were happy to arrive in Rowardennan around midday. Having plenty of time we opted to stop for a cuppa. This was a good move as we met the local barman – his craic is truly the best!! We both remembered him from previous visits here. He kindly reserved us a table for evening, right by the fire. Boost!

Setting off, we followed a good hard packed path on the initial ascent up Ben Lomond. Unfortunately the path, although clear, did become slightly tougher underfoot as we progressed. Feeling renewed though, we weren’t phased, and continued quite happily, climbing gently all the way.

As we gained height the temperature began to drop and the gloves went on. Continuing, the wind began to pick up and the jackets also went on. I also began to feel a little weary, legs tiring, so food was required to perk me up a bit. It’s amazing what a Mars bar can do for your mood!

More climbing, more food, and before we knew it, the final pull up the ridge was in sight. We met so many people, either passing them on their way up or down. It appears that quite a few of them bailed as we didn’t see them again.

Ben Lomond, looking back to Loch Lomond

Reaching the summit, it got really quite blustery – never go 100% on weather forecast; there shouldn’t have been any wind!! We didn’t linger as the wind chill was quite significant, and I donned my ‘Tuff Bags’ on top of my gloves – just the thing to cut out the wind and warm me up a little!

Heading off the summit, I was encouraged to head over the smaller top for a good photo. I’m sure there was an ulterior motive here as Bruce was quite some distance away, encouraging me to step this way or that, look over towards the view, all the while knowing that I’m a little terrified of big drops and struggle to look down – and it was windy! Tough luck! I live to see another day.

Coming off Ben Lomond

Heading down we were rewarded with fantastic views of Loch Lomond. This was some recompense for the fact that it took quite a while to drop out of the wind. It’s amazing how much quicker the descent can be!

View from Ben Lomond

As we reached the lower slopes the sunlight was starting to fade a little, showcasing the view to perfection. A wonderful end to a great day, so glad we allowed ourselves the time to do this. A very different story to the day we got drookit on this hill back in 2016!

View coming off Ben Lomond

Arriving back at the hotel we had a thoroughly enjoyable evening, meeting fellow walkers from Brazil, Holland and Switzerland. A roaring fire, a tasty meal and some good craic. Life is good.

Prologue: West Highland Way

Our journey started from Fort William, leaving the car at the B & B after a relaxed overnight stay. We were rather delighted to find that the Black Isle Bar had opened and enjoyed a mighty fine pizza and a refreshing beverage (or two). Company was good and we enjoyed chatting to others, whiling away a couple of hours while the rain battered down outside. Careful planning ensured we got the pub before it started and left as it went off. 1-0 up!

The next stage saw us take the mid-morning train to Milngavie, and the world once again proved tiny, finding our allocated seats opposite an American couple we’d chatted to over breakfast. Cue lots of chat about their West Highland Way adventure and our upcoming trip.

Arriving in Milngavie we went for a walk to investigate the start of the route. Having found the start (and a new signpost indicating the correct way where previously we’ve gone wrong), we headed back to the centre. The discussion then involved pub or coffee. I won! So we had coffee, then went to the pub. Got my doggy fix in both, initially with Basil the Dalmatian, who had a rather impressive foray into Costa, sadly thwarted by his human who had initially been fooled into thinking he would be delighted to see him and requesting his lead be let loose; fooled! He said a brief hello, approached another few folks, then headed indoors for cake (or not). The second, a friendly chocolate Labrador in the pub who took advantage of being local, frequently doing a circuit taking in the bar (and behind it) before being ushered out. Think he was disappointed to find that the three dog biscuits on his first ‘bounce’ were not to be repeated.

A good night’s sleep in Premier Inn followed by a hearty breakfast ensured we were good to go.