Hill of Rowan

Racing tomorrow, miles in my legs this week, and a husband keen to get up a hill, thankfully the routes he offered were easy. I opted for the shortest of two, Hill of Rowan.

Down Glen Esk, we headed for Tarfside where we parked. Along this road is a Folk Museum with a fine tearoom. Sadly this is seasonal so we couldn’t partake of their offerings at the end of the walk today. The toilets at the Tarfside car park, thankfully are not, although the opening hours are. Outdoorsy types welcome!

Warm welcome for campers at Tarfside

Leaving the car park we had a very short walk along the road before heading onto a good track. This headed upwards, climbing gently, and was good underfoot.

Looking around we could see evidence of estate management, the heather having been burned recently and other areas smoking away in the distance.

Burning heather in the distance, looking back from Hill of Rowan

As we lost sight of the very impressively sized monument as we rounded the hill, a large post marked the track that led up to the top. This continued a very gentle climb up.

Approaching the monument, Hill of Rowan

The monument, when reached was sadly locked.

Hill of Rowan monument

Very blustery at the top, we realised how sheltered we’d been on the side of the hill. The unseasonably mild weather, however, meant that although windy it was far from cold. We took in the views, then headed back down via another track that took a longer route back.

Rain forecast, our luck was in. A little spot or two started to fall but we made it back to the car before the heavens opened – only just!

A tea stop on route home saw us find the wonderful homebakes at Castleton Farm Shop. I have a feeling this won’t be our last time there!

Long Run & Clachnaben Walk

After yesterday’s wind we woke to a calm day today. Unfortunately this also meant ground frost and disappointment for the golfer of the house (no winter eclectic competition due to winter greens). Thus, he fancied a hill day instead. The runner of the house had other ideas though, in the shape of the first 16 miler of the marathon plan.

Off I set, a fraction later than planned – the only thing I’m ever on time for is work – and the planned four miles before meeting the Social Sunday gang turned into three and a bit instead. I made it up to the gate and all the way back down to the car park unfortunately. Picking them up part way would have made things a little easier on the legs!

Alan had amassed a fair crowd, twenty runners he said. I was glad of not having to stop and just kept on back up the side of the golf course at Hazlehead. Chat was good, pace was comfortable, and before I knew it we were at the road crossing for Countesswells. I must apologise to my fellow social Sunday runners as this was where I became antisocial. We generally regroup at this point, but my logical head was thinking along the lines of, ‘if sixteen miles is the furthest you go on this plan and you want to stand on the start line believing you can run twenty six miles, you’d better just keep your body going!’ So I muttered something about being antisocial and headed on solo.

Twice around the lovely Kingshill, I felt comfortable in the pace and ran steady, finishing back at Hazlehead under the sixteen miles which meant bimbling up and down the reps lane briefly.

Timed well, the hard core of the Sunday gang (Graham, Alan and George) then arrived, having completed their miles, and the most important part of the run, coffee, was had in the warmth of Cafe Cognito alongside some other reprobates who had knocked out their miles and headed down a little earlier.

The legs felt good, thankfully, as the golfer of the house messaged suggesting an afternoon walk. Headed out to Clachnaben for a lovely walk in the afternoon sunshine.

The view towards Clachnaben

Prepared for snowy conditions we were pleasantly surprised to find the hill clear. A fairly gentle climb, the wind picked up towards the top necessitating both down jacket and shell. We encountered only one small section of hard packed snow / ice, and being rather precious about my legs at the moment the Kahtoola spikes went on for me; Bruce managed fine without his.

Soup at the top was tasty, turned around and headed back the way we’d come. Legs felt good; it was only when we stopped off at Asda to pick up pizza I felt the efforts of the day. Hopefully short lived, another week of the plan completed.

Last Outing of the Year: Pressendye

In an ideal world we’d have finished the year as we started – on a munro. However, the weather had other ideas, and with the prospect of blustery tops and cloud we decided to stay lower instead. The plan was therefore to head for Ballater to do the Seven Bridges Walk. No arrangements had been made with regards to timing and one of us (me!) decided to stay in bed late, the upshot being that we were then left questioning the wisdom of this decision given the journey time and length of walk. Hence, we happened upon Pressendye instead.

Pressendye’s a fine wee hill (a Graham) and is easily accessed on a circular route from Tarland. The initial walk out on the road is about 2 miles and is the least enjoyable part. After that you reach the track that heads upwards, leading to fields, then up towards the summit of the hill. There’s nothing overly strenuous about it, navigation is easy – we’ve done it a few times so didn’t bother with route guides or maps today – and before you know it you’re up, with views to Mount Keen in one direction and Bennachie in the other.

As we walked today we chatted and had our own review of the year, sharing our thoughts on what we felt had been our personal achievements and best moments, alongside our goals for next year – London Marathon for me and quite a number of new munros for Bruce.

Heading up it did get blustery, although with temperatures unseasonably high it was far from unpleasant. Heading off the summit it’s an easy track descent with signposts for the circular route further down to guide you back in the direction of Tarland. There are two routes; admittedly we forgot to check where they go on our return to the village!

One of my favourite parts of the walk is the beautiful tree lined path as you get lower. For old times sake I stopped to hug a tree, then remembered how good this feels so hugged another few on the way down. I think this is on a par with being in the mountains; it makes you realise that you really are just a small part of a much bigger picture!

Hug a tree!

On that note, I hope you’re feeling positive should you be reflecting on the year or thinking about the next one. However small, there’s always something to be grateful for.

An Socach: Roaming Free

It feels like a long time since we’ve been in the hills and December has been a long month so far. Despite my best intentions to be active, the dark nights and life in general have conspired against me; a general feeling of malaise and a lack of motivation to get out at all. Thankfully, with the holidays now upon us I had a newfound desire to get out and was delighted to be met with a good forecast for the weekend.

After a little deliberation thanks to Bruce’s planning with various options of offer, but primarily due to the car parking area being full, we made the decision to park a few hundred metres further along and head up An Socach. I had a desire to get up high, and Loch Callater just didn’t hold the same appeal today. We were also in agreement that it’s a better option when the loch is frozen and it’s not cold enough for that as yet.

It did amuse me somewhat that Bruce made mention of the extra walk (all 300 metres of it, making a 600 metre addition in total). I sometimes think similar thoughts when parking in order to go for a run or walk; bizarre given the total distance you’d cover without thinking about it in order to achieve the planned route itself. Anyway, along the road we set, and within a very short time were on the correct route, a good track that leads to the path for ascending the munro.

The first obstacle in our path was a small stream crossing. This shouldn’t have presented any difficulty with a few small rocks and boulders paving the way, but on my crossing I managed to slip on one of the stones, thankfully only dipping my toes in and not getting wet feet, but still enough to make me wary of the others. This later led to us thinking perhaps we could head around and ascend via another route that we could see opposite us.

Heading up to An Socach

Continuing up, I was in a thoughtful mood and my mind wandered to a running friend who has recently passed away. He and I had talked hills on a few occasions and it seemed fitting to say a quiet goodbye as we reached the windshelter cairn on An Socach.

Windshelter cairn on An Socach

The wind on this broad plateau had picked up and it was beginning to get chilly. However, the sun came out and provided warmth as we moved off. We had decided not to go to the second windshelter (the true summit cairn) as we’ve done this munro previously, instead deciding to roam free and head off in another direction rather than retracing our steps. Heading down we followed a large snow patch and it was fun going over this. I have to admit that I did generally follow in Bruce’s footsteps making the going easier for myself. I decided that this was Type 1 fun. This was a topic of discussion at the Dundee Mountain Film Festival, and this is genuine fun where you’re enjoying the here and now. This changed to Type 2 fun, the type of thing that isn’t particularly fun at the time, being challenging or tough and involving mind over matter, when we realised that we were in fact heading into Glen Ey, not where we wanted to be at all!

On a positive note, this forced us into testing our navigational skills. With the help of the map, compass and OS Locate to give us very accurate grid references, we realised that we had to head back up towards Sgurr Mor in order to pick up the path back towards our track again. This proved to be quite a slog and involved both boggy ground and heather bashing. On the upside, we saw a herd of deer on the hillside and several mountain hares who made bounding up the hill look very effortless indeed!

Navigational skills being tested

Repeated checks of the map proved that we were on the right line, and reaching the flatter path on the approach to Sgurr Mor we could see where we were aiming for.

Strava elevation profile

Finally we made it onto the path down the opposite side of the stream and had views back to An Socach again looking clear in the late afternoon sun. It was a relief to be able to view the track on which we’d return to the car. Despite never being lost and always feeling confident in our navigational ability, there had been a moment where I’d wondered if we’d be needing our head torches for the return leg. As it transpired, we made good time and got back with daylight remaining.

Back on the correct path, descending from An Socach

All that was left to do was head to The Bothy in Braemar for coffee and cake. Today’s offering of Lemon Drizzle Cake was outstanding and really put the shine back into the day.

Drumnadrochit Holiday Part 2, featuring Bruce’s 200th munro!

Day 5: Sgurr a’Mhaoraich

Heading along the road by Loch Ness we started the day off well! Rosie & Jim’s barge was on Loch Ness! Not convinced I’d like to be on a flat bottomed barge on the loch on a breezy day but then again, Rosie and Jim may well balk at the idea of a munro! Perhaps they’re looking for Nessie!

Heading out the minor road to Loch Quoich, we came upon a herd of heilan’ coos. One of them had managed to navigate their way across the cattle grid so this alerted us to the fact there may be others. They were in no rush to move, standing majestically with either their whole self, head or bum in the road! We discovered the best way to get past them on this single track road was just to drive very slowly towards them, wait for the final haughty look, and then say a silent prayer that on shifting they’d not take their horns along the side of the car! Mercifully they were kind to us on this occasion.

We finally reached our parking spot, the car now covered in cow dung, just in time for a big black rain cloud to appear down the loch. Knowing there was a shower forecast we opted to sit it out in the car. It came to nothing, instead clinging to the loch, so we donned our waterproofs and headed out.

The walk headed up straight away, following the stalkers path. This was a fairly narrow path but provided a clear route which allowed us to gain height fairly quickly. As it steepened, the path began to zigzag easing the effort required and providing brief respite for the legs.

Sgurr a’Mhaoraich, first glimpse from the path up

Heading for the summit of Sgurr a’Mhaoraich, two summits of Sgurr Coire nan Eirichean are crossed. We met ‘Dad and the loon’ coming back as the wind began to pick up a little, and Dad said they’d turned back on the ridge as the loon was getting blasted by the wind too much. Being relatively small he’d ended up on all fours as he was being buffeted. Further on we met a solo walker who told us the ridge was quite exposed and the descent was ‘interesting’. I wonder retrospectively if this was some sort of manly attempt to psych us out as he and Bruce had just shared their munro counts, both due to hit 200 soon, Bruce being one ahead. The rain began, quickly turning to sleet, and we were advised that there was a wee drop we could shelter in a few minutes away.

A ‘pleasure’ of the hills is feeling the elements. There’s nothing that makes you feel closer to the earth than your face being battered by cold rain, sleet, or even hailstones as we enjoyed briefly. This bout was mercifully short-lived as we didn’t really find any real respite from it.

Continuing onwards the summit path, although clear, did look a little daunting with a steep gradient towards the top. Again Bruce assured me I’ve done worse and I declined the car key (in order to walk back slowly if it got too much), instead saying I’d yell if I needed it. Sometimes it is best to avoid temptation!

In the event, the ridge was very short, the drops off were not too dramatic – it would have been more of a roly poly down rather than anything else as the banks were grassy – and the rocky sections were negotiable by following the path around. The only steep bit was at the top and it had foot prints in the muck to guide the way.

All good, we arrived at the summit unscathed. The weather was in our favour once again and we were able to drink in the beautiful views from cairn before heading back the way we’d come.

Summit of Sgurr a’Mhaoraich

Summit view from Sgurr a’Mhaoraich

Similar to the route up, we were between the summits of Sgurr Coire nan Eirichean when the heavens opened once again. This time the shower was prolonged and as we dropped downwards we transitioned from a wee flurry of snow to sleet, hail and rain. Funnily enough, it doesn’t feel so bad when it’s at your back!

Looking back to Gleouraich

In good spirits, happy to have successfully completed another munro and having enjoyed the stunning scenery once again, we made our way back to the car. Chatting to a couple of guys headed for an overnight camp before kayaking over to one of their second last munro summits, we once again timed things to perfection, getting into the car just as another downpour came along.

Passed the coos safely – no less enthusiastic about moving off the road – kit hung up to dry (thanks to our lovely landlady at Greenlea B & B), time for a wee glass of something before dinner calls.

Day 6: Beinn Fhada and A’Ghlas-beinn

Rosie & Jim’s barge was at the end of the loch. It appeared to be anchored there so I’m thinking perhaps they’re either still hot in pursuit of Nessie, or having an adventure at Urquhart Castle.

That aside, today we headed out with a mission ourselves – to claim Bruce’s 200th munro! We headed into Kintail once again, the intention being to combine two single munros into one. This was set to be a long day!

Our first issue came in the form of a road closure. We pulled off at Morvich and found we had to add a mile and a half by walking up the road. Later we realised we could have gotten further by continuing along the main road; hind sight is a great thing! The path up to the first munro was good, albeit it was a few miles in before we started to gain any real height. We had no issues crossing the stream, a welcome relief, and it was a straightforward gradual ascent to the fork in the path leading the way to the two respective summits. Sadly this was only around 400 metres and we’d started pretty much at sea level.

The first munro, Beinn Fhada, saw us head up a zig zagging path before a long walk straight across the plateau to the top. This was boggy in places but there were enough stones to hop across the dubs relatively clean and, more importantly, dry. It was a shame that the cloud thickened at this point as this was Bruce’s 200th munro and he didn’t really get much of a view. A couple of others (and their dog) had reached the summit ahead of us so we had a brief chat, and a wee nip in celebration, before making our way back to the junction.

We were aware that we were on the clock as we’d started after 10:30 am and were likely to run out of daylight. Our headtorches were packed but we hoped to get most of the way without them. We made good time on the descent, passing a couple who had just come from our next target, A’Ghlas-beinn. However, on chatting their timings confirmed our thinking; we weren’t getting back to the car in daylight no matter how much we wished for it!

The temptation had been to head straight across the plateau as it looked like the two munros were connected by a ridge, but the route guides Bruce had read and the contours on the map suggested this may not be the best idea. In the event when we’d made it back to the split in the paths and up to the cairn at the bealach we realised we’d done the right thing. The drop between the two, albeit probably manageable certainly wasn’t for the faint hearted and would necessitate very dry underfoot conditions!

The second munro again had a good path up and this climbed quite steeply through the zig zags. We were happy with this as it meant we were gaining height more quickly. We’d been advised by the couple we’d met that there were a few false summits. The Garmin also kept us up to speed with the altitude which was a blessing as there were a few summits and what felt like a long way between them! The second last of these had an interesting scrambly little bit followed by a steep up (I’m advised this was a ‘chimney’) that was interesting on the way down. We also had a jet thunder past below us in celebration of Bruce having completed munro 200. Not quite the same as the American Thunderbirds flying in formation for my 100th, but we’ll take it all the same.

The summit this time was clear and we got great views, both agreeing that of the two A’Ghlas-beinn was the finest today. We didn’t linger too long, again conscious of the time for getting down, keen to be over the stream and on the flatter path before the fall of darkness.

As previously mentioned, there were a couple of interesting bits to contend with, but on the whole the path was good and we made decent time. We got back across the stream with plenty of light left and it was only in the trees that we started to feel the evening draw in. Headtorches donned, we hot footed it back to the road, delighted to be back in the vicinity of the car.

Finally back, we were so grateful of the chance to sit down! 18.5 miles done, 2 munros, and a very enjoyable week away.

Drumnadrochit Holiday Part 1: Kintail munros and the Caledonian Canal

Day 2: Carn Ghluasaid, Sgurr nan Conbhairean & Sail Chaorainn

Day 1 was a day of ‘nothing’ really. The original plan was that Bruce would meet me in Inverness on Friday evening having done another couple of Skye munros. The reality was that he went to work and we went up together as their Skye guide had cancelled the walk, the horrible rain and wind of Friday continuing into Saturday and putting paid to the first day’s walking. On the upside, we had a leisurely day and rested for once!

You can therefore imagine our delight to wake up to a dry morning with low cloud, no rain, and a forecast suggesting the sun would break through later in the day. A hearty breakfast at our B & B, Greenlea, following a solid night’s sleep set us up for the day ahead.

Despite my lack of appreciation at times for Bruce’s forward planning (usually when he’s talking hills late of a weekday evening when all I want to do is get to bed), he pulled an ace today! Having read the route guides and studied the maps carefully he had chosen a route that had good paths and would avoid water crossings, ideal for a day when the steams could be in spate.

Heading out, the parking area at Lundie was easily found and we then had a clear path, following the old military road, to begin our climb. This route quickly turned off onto a very good hill path which led us all the way up to Carn Ghluasaid. Despite the rain this was relatively dry and towards the top there was little evidence of yesterday’s downpours at all as the path zig-zagged and pulled us upwards at a good steady pace. The weather was stunning and it was one of those days where you truly appreciate being outdoors. The scenery all around was beautiful with the hills of Kintail opening up an amazing panorama. It really doesn’t get better than this!

Despite the sunny day, as we’d approached the summit it clouded over a little and it was amazing how quickly we chilled on stopping. Extra layers and more gloves were added and after a quick snack stop we were raring to go again and slowly warmed up.

The second munro, shrouded in cloud, was somewhat intimidating from the distance as is often the case (or so Bruce reminded me). We made good time on the descent to the bealach and before long we were making our ascent towards the second summit of the day, Sgurr nan Conbhairean. Ahead of us we could see another walker and meeting him at the impressive summit cairn we enjoyed a good chat over another snack break. Always great to chat and talk hills, we headed off ahead of him knowing our paths would probably cross later.

Sail Chaorainn

Sgurr nan Conbhairean was rather impressive from the far side with a short steep descent to the bealach and yet more impressive views to the surrounding hills.

Coming off Sgurr nan Conbhairean

It’s funny how distances can be skewed when out in the hills. The third munro of the day appeared a fair hike away but we covered ground quickly and reached the final short pull up to Sail Chaorainn. It was hard to comprehend that this was a munro being quite indistict with a tiny cairn marking the highest point. As this first cairn marks the highest point we decided against continuing to the furthest cairn. Bruce then wondered whether he’ll live to regret this decision – should they remeasure the tops at any point there’s only a metre between them! Not an issue for me as I’ve always said I’ve no intention of completing; I also argued that as of the date we summitted this was the true top.

Sail Chaorainn, the third summit of the day, an easy walk

To descend we had to retrace our steps and head back towards Sgurr nan Conbhairean. Mistakenly, I remembered the small cairn indicating the path off to descend the ridge was within easy reach. While it wasn’t too far I was somewhat disappointed to realise that I had to reascend a fair way first, only missing the last pull back up to the second munro.

Walking back from Sail Chaorainn, view towards Sgurr nan Conbhairean

The descent took us along a ridge, again offering views of the layers of hills around us. This made for an initial easy descent before becoming rougher and steeper further down. The light was spectacular however, with the sun highlighting the tops and truly showing the summits at their best with the beautiful autumn colour all around.

Towards the end of the walk, Carn Ghluasaid, Sgurr nan Conbhairean & Sail Chaorainn in the bag

The one water crossing of the day, Allt Coire nan Clach, was thankfully easy as were the further small streams. The ground got boggy as we descended and it was with relief that we saw the transmitter mast, knowing that the car park was very close by.

The day ended well, a wee jaunt along the road taking us to the Cluanie Inn where we once again rendezvoused with our fellow walker from the second top, enjoying yet more hill chat and a very well earned supper!

Fish & chips at the Clunaie Inn

Day 3: Spidean Mialach & Gleouraich

Another dry day forecast, we decided to tackle Spidean Mialach and Gleouraich, hoping that the fog and heavy cloud might lift from the tops to afford the stunning views to the surrounding munros and the currently untouched (for us) Knoydart. The thinking was that even if we didn’t get views from the tops, we’d hopefully get some views on the way down. As the photos (kindly shared by @AbBruce) will show, once again the mountain weather went in our favour and we had an amazing day out!

The road out to these munros was single track with passing places. My concern that I wouldn’t be able to find the parking spot due to a lack of features on the map were unfounded (thanks Garmin eTrex) and we were soon headed up the path. Going was good despite being a little boggy underfoot. It was a pleasant surprise to find that although the stalkers path petered our slightly there was still a muddy track to follow. As we gained height the views below were stunning and this made the effort worthwhile!

Heading up to Spidean Mialach

Summits around could be seen in cloud, but there were also occasional breaks. We continued our upward slog, gaining height at a decent rate, and passing another couple along the way. The wind picked up a little; just stopping to chat alongside this and the cloud coming over was enough to chill me quickly. Several layers were added at this point to keep my bodyheat up.

Reaching the summit we found a cairn on the edge of the cliffs. Poles were left outside the cairn due to my clumsiness; you really wouldn’t want to trip on the way out! An ideal lunch spot, the cairn provided us with shelter and as we sat the cloud cleared and the views opened up to reveal the South Glenshiel Ridge opposite.

Continuing onwards we had a fine ridge to cross which revealed the path up to Creag Coire na Fiar Bhealaich. This for me was extremely intimidating! All I could see was a bit of a path going upwards with what appeared to be steep rocky drops on both sides. Bruce was thankfully in his best carer / mountain guide mode, and offered words of reassurance and a reminder I’ve conquered worse than this before. He even offered to carry a pole for me to hold should I wish to be lead. It turns out he was right (on this occasion; there have also been others!) There was a pretty good path once we got going and I have done more challenging hills than this! Had I been alone I’d probably have bailed and would have missed the amazing views!

Looking towards Gleouraich

The summit of Gleouraich was reached after another brief descent and ascent, and with the sun still out this provided the perfect spot to take in the views again. Truly spectacular I could have sat there all day!

Summit of Gleouraich

Dragging ourselves away, we descended via a good stalkers path again which was mercifully dry. Quads felt suitably mashed after yesterday’s endeavours and it was a delight to finally see the car.

A fabulous day out, even better than yesterday!

Day 4: Fort Augustus and Drumnadrochit

Yesterday I tweeted that the day couldn’t get much better. I was wrong! Today we went to Fort Augustus as the hill forecast was too windy to get out with much pleasure being such that it would impede our movement. Our plan had been to go for a walk around Fort Augustus, but having popped into the Caledonian Canal Visitor Centre I had to have a peek to see if there were any boats coming through the locks before I could leave.

How excited was I? Rosie & Jim’s barge (officially known as part of the Caledonian Discovery fleet) was coming!

Fort Augustus: Rosie & Jim’s barge approaches the locks on the Caledonian Canal (Caledonian Cruises)

We spent quite a while watching the barge (and a smaller boat) go through all the locks. Thanks to Bruce for allowing me the time to do this. He’d probably just have watched one gate had he been alone! When the barge finally sailed through the final lock complete with the road opening up, we headed for a cuppa, morning successfully passed!

Afternoon, following yet another power nap in the car (me, not him – this is why he drives longer distances), we had a wee jaunt around Drumnadrochit. Heading for Craigmonie woodland we both agreed that a woodland walk can be quite pleasurable, just not 70 miles of it, which was the feeling we had when we walked the Great Glen Way.

The autumnal trees were beautiful with their changing colours and the silver birches were lit up in the afternoon sunshine. A couple of lovely viewpoints showed us the local villages of Milton and Drumnadrochit.

Continuing on we took a minor road to walk up to the Falls of Divach, the only regret being that we couldn’t get up close for photos due to the fence and the drop; that and my refusal to get onto Bruce’s shoulders to take a photo!!

Falls of Divach

Bennachie and it’s neighbours – lazy Sunday afternoon

Deciding to make the most of the comparatively fine afternoon we decided to head for Bennachie. It’s been a long time since we’ve been here, usually favouring munros or the smaller hills out Deeside way. However, a change can be good and this meant we’d get both an afternoon walk and an evening at home.

There are many routes up Bennachie, as is very evident from the multiple signposts now adorning the hillside! We chose to start our walk at the Rowantree Car Park today which gives a relatively gentle pull up the hill.

Approaching Mither Tap (Bennachie) from Rowantree Car Park

It was a great day for it. The rain from this morning had cleared and there was barely a breath of wind. It’s amazing how quickly you find yourself on the summit when doing a smaller hill!

We sat chatting with another couple for a good while before heading off, then making the decision to do the neighbouring summits of Oxen Craig, higher than Bennachie, but less visited. While looking quite far off there’s a very good path (as there is on all these hills) and it’s a very short hop between them.

We then retraced our steps a little to branch off onto Craig Shannoch before heading back down to join the path back to the Rowantree car park.

A fine afternoon out. The only disappointing thing was the amount of discarded litter we encountered. I wonder if people who leave their water bottles and other junk believe that there’s a refuse collection mid-week? We did out bit for the environment though and in true Womble style carried quite a few pieces off the hill.