Three cheers for Hazel! Joining an awesome lady on her 10th compleation of the munros!

I love being out in the hills on a fine day, so was quite intrigued by Bruce’s suggestion that we join Hazel Strachan to complete her 10th round of the munros. Hazel is one amazing lady. We follow her on Twitter (@StrachanHazel) and she’d sent an open invitation to join her in the final munro of this circuit, Carn an Tuirc. As I learned from chatting today, not only has she completed the full round of munros ten times, she also manages to hold down a job as a Scientist and maintain a relationship with her lovely husband, Ian, who accompanies her in their camper van. Major kudos on managing all that!

The walk was initially scheduled for Saturday but was sensibly postponed due to a very wet and windy forecast. Checking the weather before setting out I’ll be honest; I was less than thrilled with the potential for 50-60 mph gusts on the top today (Sunday). Our only hope was that it would blow over earlier than planned as later in the afternoon was reportedly better. On the upside it was dry, albeit foggy.

Arriving at the car park, a few miles out of Braemar, we were greeted by the sight of a couple of cars and a camper van. Sincere thanks to both Hazel and Ian for the hospitality; we were warmly welcomed and invited in where we met Chris (@jepsonscotland) initially, swiftly joined by John (@KingGuiding), then Craig (@csa_adventure) all enjoying a chat, a few nibbles and the shelter from the wind. Others arrived over the next wee while and so we moved outdoors to get boots and rucksacks ready. All in all I think there were 20 people setting out. We had a quick round of introductions and one last offer of coffee in the van with a lorne sausage bap thrown in from Ian as an alternative to the walk; I was almost tempted.

Setting off, we established a comfortable walking pace and there was easy chatter among the group. It was really enjoyable being able to talk to different people, learning about their experiences in the hills with many compleatists among them, several more with less than a handful to go. Somewhat boggy, the path was clear making easy walking.

Heading up Carn an Tuirc
A wee procession up the hill toward Carn an Tuirc

The joy of being in such a large group was that time flew by in the best possible sense. There were lots of others to follow, an easy crossing of a small stream, and before long we were heading to the munro summit, clearly visible all the way – no fog!

The ascent fairly steady and gentle, the group spread out a little as people stopped to take photos, admire the views, or add extra layers as the wind picked up. The odd gust here and there knocked me a little bit but on the whole it was very tolerable and warmer than expected. We made it to the summit, touching the cairn before heading for the wee wind shelter.

Bruce & I on the summit of Carn an Tuirc
Bruce looking steady while I try to avoid blowing over!

More people joined us and then the lady herself appeared, having allowed others up ahead of her. We quickly assembled to form a guard of honour, Hazel walking under the clacking sticks to big cheers in order to reach the summit cairn.

Photographs were taken and further congratulations offered by the assembled friends; I retreated to the sanctuary of the wind shelter for a snack. Meanwhile, Alan (@MunroMoonwalker) was scouting around and had found a sheltered spot, dropping down off the summit slightly. Assembling here, Hazel kindly cracked open several bottles of champagne allowing us to toast her achievement in style.

Slowly people began to drift off back up and over the summit, down the hill as the chill began to set in. I’m not sure if it really was quite mild or if it was my new jacket, but I remained pleasantly warm throughout.

Heading down I enjoyed the company of John, chatting about his role as a Guide and our mutual enjoyment of running. Bruce followed in our wake, chatting with others, and before long we were back at the road, greeted by Ian who had enjoyed the peace, a good breakfast and his book. I’m now seeing more and more advantages in acquiring a camper van somewhere down the line!

Our final stop on the road was The Bothy, my favourite coffee shop in Braemar (and Ballater for that matter) where we gathered for coffee, cake and chat.

Many thanks to Hazel for extending the invitation. It was a joy to be part of such a momentous occasion! Thanks also to everyone that turned out; it was a pleasure meeting you all today. Look forward to hopefully doing it again in 2020 when Hazel aims to complete her 11th round. Maybe I’ll have passed 150 munros by then!

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Drumnadrochit Holiday Part 2, featuring Bruce’s 200th munro!

Day 5: Sgurr a’Mhaoraich

Heading along the road by Loch Ness we started the day off well! Rosie & Jim’s barge was on Loch Ness! Not convinced I’d like to be on a flat bottomed barge on the loch on a breezy day but then again, Rosie and Jim may well balk at the idea of a munro! Perhaps they’re looking for Nessie!

Heading out the minor road to Loch Quoich, we came upon a herd of heilan’ coos. One of them had managed to navigate their way across the cattle grid so this alerted us to the fact there may be others. They were in no rush to move, standing majestically with either their whole self, head or bum in the road! We discovered the best way to get past them on this single track road was just to drive very slowly towards them, wait for the final haughty look, and then say a silent prayer that on shifting they’d not take their horns along the side of the car! Mercifully they were kind to us on this occasion.

We finally reached our parking spot, the car now covered in cow dung, just in time for a big black rain cloud to appear down the loch. Knowing there was a shower forecast we opted to sit it out in the car. It came to nothing, instead clinging to the loch, so we donned our waterproofs and headed out.

The walk headed up straight away, following the stalkers path. This was a fairly narrow path but provided a clear route which allowed us to gain height fairly quickly. As it steepened, the path began to zigzag easing the effort required and providing brief respite for the legs.

Sgurr a’Mhaoraich, first glimpse from the path up

Heading for the summit of Sgurr a’Mhaoraich, two summits of Sgurr Coire nan Eirichean are crossed. We met ‘Dad and the loon’ coming back as the wind began to pick up a little, and Dad said they’d turned back on the ridge as the loon was getting blasted by the wind too much. Being relatively small he’d ended up on all fours as he was being buffeted. Further on we met a solo walker who told us the ridge was quite exposed and the descent was ‘interesting’. I wonder retrospectively if this was some sort of manly attempt to psych us out as he and Bruce had just shared their munro counts, both due to hit 200 soon, Bruce being one ahead. The rain began, quickly turning to sleet, and we were advised that there was a wee drop we could shelter in a few minutes away.

A ‘pleasure’ of the hills is feeling the elements. There’s nothing that makes you feel closer to the earth than your face being battered by cold rain, sleet, or even hailstones as we enjoyed briefly. This bout was mercifully short-lived as we didn’t really find any real respite from it.

Continuing onwards the summit path, although clear, did look a little daunting with a steep gradient towards the top. Again Bruce assured me I’ve done worse and I declined the car key (in order to walk back slowly if it got too much), instead saying I’d yell if I needed it. Sometimes it is best to avoid temptation!

In the event, the ridge was very short, the drops off were not too dramatic – it would have been more of a roly poly down rather than anything else as the banks were grassy – and the rocky sections were negotiable by following the path around. The only steep bit was at the top and it had foot prints in the muck to guide the way.

All good, we arrived at the summit unscathed. The weather was in our favour once again and we were able to drink in the beautiful views from cairn before heading back the way we’d come.

Summit of Sgurr a’Mhaoraich

Summit view from Sgurr a’Mhaoraich

Similar to the route up, we were between the summits of Sgurr Coire nan Eirichean when the heavens opened once again. This time the shower was prolonged and as we dropped downwards we transitioned from a wee flurry of snow to sleet, hail and rain. Funnily enough, it doesn’t feel so bad when it’s at your back!

Looking back to Gleouraich

In good spirits, happy to have successfully completed another munro and having enjoyed the stunning scenery once again, we made our way back to the car. Chatting to a couple of guys headed for an overnight camp before kayaking over to one of their second last munro summits, we once again timed things to perfection, getting into the car just as another downpour came along.

Passed the coos safely – no less enthusiastic about moving off the road – kit hung up to dry (thanks to our lovely landlady at Greenlea B & B), time for a wee glass of something before dinner calls.

Day 6: Beinn Fhada and A’Ghlas-beinn

Rosie & Jim’s barge was at the end of the loch. It appeared to be anchored there so I’m thinking perhaps they’re either still hot in pursuit of Nessie, or having an adventure at Urquhart Castle.

That aside, today we headed out with a mission ourselves – to claim Bruce’s 200th munro! We headed into Kintail once again, the intention being to combine two single munros into one. This was set to be a long day!

Our first issue came in the form of a road closure. We pulled off at Morvich and found we had to add a mile and a half by walking up the road. Later we realised we could have gotten further by continuing along the main road; hind sight is a great thing! The path up to the first munro was good, albeit it was a few miles in before we started to gain any real height. We had no issues crossing the stream, a welcome relief, and it was a straightforward gradual ascent to the fork in the path leading the way to the two respective summits. Sadly this was only around 400 metres and we’d started pretty much at sea level.

The first munro, Beinn Fhada, saw us head up a zig zagging path before a long walk straight across the plateau to the top. This was boggy in places but there were enough stones to hop across the dubs relatively clean and, more importantly, dry. It was a shame that the cloud thickened at this point as this was Bruce’s 200th munro and he didn’t really get much of a view. A couple of others (and their dog) had reached the summit ahead of us so we had a brief chat, and a wee nip in celebration, before making our way back to the junction.

We were aware that we were on the clock as we’d started after 10:30 am and were likely to run out of daylight. Our headtorches were packed but we hoped to get most of the way without them. We made good time on the descent, passing a couple who had just come from our next target, A’Ghlas-beinn. However, on chatting their timings confirmed our thinking; we weren’t getting back to the car in daylight no matter how much we wished for it!

The temptation had been to head straight across the plateau as it looked like the two munros were connected by a ridge, but the route guides Bruce had read and the contours on the map suggested this may not be the best idea. In the event when we’d made it back to the split in the paths and up to the cairn at the bealach we realised we’d done the right thing. The drop between the two, albeit probably manageable certainly wasn’t for the faint hearted and would necessitate very dry underfoot conditions!

The second munro again had a good path up and this climbed quite steeply through the zig zags. We were happy with this as it meant we were gaining height more quickly. We’d been advised by the couple we’d met that there were a few false summits. The Garmin also kept us up to speed with the altitude which was a blessing as there were a few summits and what felt like a long way between them! The second last of these had an interesting scrambly little bit followed by a steep up (I’m advised this was a ‘chimney’) that was interesting on the way down. We also had a jet thunder past below us in celebration of Bruce having completed munro 200. Not quite the same as the American Thunderbirds flying in formation for my 100th, but we’ll take it all the same.

The summit this time was clear and we got great views, both agreeing that of the two A’Ghlas-beinn was the finest today. We didn’t linger too long, again conscious of the time for getting down, keen to be over the stream and on the flatter path before the fall of darkness.

As previously mentioned, there were a couple of interesting bits to contend with, but on the whole the path was good and we made decent time. We got back across the stream with plenty of light left and it was only in the trees that we started to feel the evening draw in. Headtorches donned, we hot footed it back to the road, delighted to be back in the vicinity of the car.

Finally back, we were so grateful of the chance to sit down! 18.5 miles done, 2 munros, and a very enjoyable week away.

Drumnadrochit Holiday Part 1: Kintail munros and the Caledonian Canal

Day 2: Carn Ghluasaid, Sgurr nan Conbhairean & Sail Chaorainn

Day 1 was a day of ‘nothing’ really. The original plan was that Bruce would meet me in Inverness on Friday evening having done another couple of Skye munros. The reality was that he went to work and we went up together as their Skye guide had cancelled the walk, the horrible rain and wind of Friday continuing into Saturday and putting paid to the first day’s walking. On the upside, we had a leisurely day and rested for once!

You can therefore imagine our delight to wake up to a dry morning with low cloud, no rain, and a forecast suggesting the sun would break through later in the day. A hearty breakfast at our B & B, Greenlea, following a solid night’s sleep set us up for the day ahead.

Despite my lack of appreciation at times for Bruce’s forward planning (usually when he’s talking hills late of a weekday evening when all I want to do is get to bed), he pulled an ace today! Having read the route guides and studied the maps carefully he had chosen a route that had good paths and would avoid water crossings, ideal for a day when the steams could be in spate.

Heading out, the parking area at Lundie was easily found and we then had a clear path, following the old military road, to begin our climb. This route quickly turned off onto a very good hill path which led us all the way up to Carn Ghluasaid. Despite the rain this was relatively dry and towards the top there was little evidence of yesterday’s downpours at all as the path zig-zagged and pulled us upwards at a good steady pace. The weather was stunning and it was one of those days where you truly appreciate being outdoors. The scenery all around was beautiful with the hills of Kintail opening up an amazing panorama. It really doesn’t get better than this!

Despite the sunny day, as we’d approached the summit it clouded over a little and it was amazing how quickly we chilled on stopping. Extra layers and more gloves were added and after a quick snack stop we were raring to go again and slowly warmed up.

The second munro, shrouded in cloud, was somewhat intimidating from the distance as is often the case (or so Bruce reminded me). We made good time on the descent to the bealach and before long we were making our ascent towards the second summit of the day, Sgurr nan Conbhairean. Ahead of us we could see another walker and meeting him at the impressive summit cairn we enjoyed a good chat over another snack break. Always great to chat and talk hills, we headed off ahead of him knowing our paths would probably cross later.

Sail Chaorainn

Sgurr nan Conbhairean was rather impressive from the far side with a short steep descent to the bealach and yet more impressive views to the surrounding hills.

Coming off Sgurr nan Conbhairean

It’s funny how distances can be skewed when out in the hills. The third munro of the day appeared a fair hike away but we covered ground quickly and reached the final short pull up to Sail Chaorainn. It was hard to comprehend that this was a munro being quite indistict with a tiny cairn marking the highest point. As this first cairn marks the highest point we decided against continuing to the furthest cairn. Bruce then wondered whether he’ll live to regret this decision – should they remeasure the tops at any point there’s only a metre between them! Not an issue for me as I’ve always said I’ve no intention of completing; I also argued that as of the date we summitted this was the true top.

Sail Chaorainn, the third summit of the day, an easy walk

To descend we had to retrace our steps and head back towards Sgurr nan Conbhairean. Mistakenly, I remembered the small cairn indicating the path off to descend the ridge was within easy reach. While it wasn’t too far I was somewhat disappointed to realise that I had to reascend a fair way first, only missing the last pull back up to the second munro.

Walking back from Sail Chaorainn, view towards Sgurr nan Conbhairean

The descent took us along a ridge, again offering views of the layers of hills around us. This made for an initial easy descent before becoming rougher and steeper further down. The light was spectacular however, with the sun highlighting the tops and truly showing the summits at their best with the beautiful autumn colour all around.

Towards the end of the walk, Carn Ghluasaid, Sgurr nan Conbhairean & Sail Chaorainn in the bag

The one water crossing of the day, Allt Coire nan Clach, was thankfully easy as were the further small streams. The ground got boggy as we descended and it was with relief that we saw the transmitter mast, knowing that the car park was very close by.

The day ended well, a wee jaunt along the road taking us to the Cluanie Inn where we once again rendezvoused with our fellow walker from the second top, enjoying yet more hill chat and a very well earned supper!

Fish & chips at the Clunaie Inn

Day 3: Spidean Mialach & Gleouraich

Another dry day forecast, we decided to tackle Spidean Mialach and Gleouraich, hoping that the fog and heavy cloud might lift from the tops to afford the stunning views to the surrounding munros and the currently untouched (for us) Knoydart. The thinking was that even if we didn’t get views from the tops, we’d hopefully get some views on the way down. As the photos (kindly shared by @AbBruce) will show, once again the mountain weather went in our favour and we had an amazing day out!

The road out to these munros was single track with passing places. My concern that I wouldn’t be able to find the parking spot due to a lack of features on the map were unfounded (thanks Garmin eTrex) and we were soon headed up the path. Going was good despite being a little boggy underfoot. It was a pleasant surprise to find that although the stalkers path petered our slightly there was still a muddy track to follow. As we gained height the views below were stunning and this made the effort worthwhile!

Heading up to Spidean Mialach

Summits around could be seen in cloud, but there were also occasional breaks. We continued our upward slog, gaining height at a decent rate, and passing another couple along the way. The wind picked up a little; just stopping to chat alongside this and the cloud coming over was enough to chill me quickly. Several layers were added at this point to keep my bodyheat up.

Reaching the summit we found a cairn on the edge of the cliffs. Poles were left outside the cairn due to my clumsiness; you really wouldn’t want to trip on the way out! An ideal lunch spot, the cairn provided us with shelter and as we sat the cloud cleared and the views opened up to reveal the South Glenshiel Ridge opposite.

Continuing onwards we had a fine ridge to cross which revealed the path up to Creag Coire na Fiar Bhealaich. This for me was extremely intimidating! All I could see was a bit of a path going upwards with what appeared to be steep rocky drops on both sides. Bruce was thankfully in his best carer / mountain guide mode, and offered words of reassurance and a reminder I’ve conquered worse than this before. He even offered to carry a pole for me to hold should I wish to be lead. It turns out he was right (on this occasion; there have also been others!) There was a pretty good path once we got going and I have done more challenging hills than this! Had I been alone I’d probably have bailed and would have missed the amazing views!

Looking towards Gleouraich

The summit of Gleouraich was reached after another brief descent and ascent, and with the sun still out this provided the perfect spot to take in the views again. Truly spectacular I could have sat there all day!

Summit of Gleouraich

Dragging ourselves away, we descended via a good stalkers path again which was mercifully dry. Quads felt suitably mashed after yesterday’s endeavours and it was a delight to finally see the car.

A fabulous day out, even better than yesterday!

Day 4: Fort Augustus and Drumnadrochit

Yesterday I tweeted that the day couldn’t get much better. I was wrong! Today we went to Fort Augustus as the hill forecast was too windy to get out with much pleasure being such that it would impede our movement. Our plan had been to go for a walk around Fort Augustus, but having popped into the Caledonian Canal Visitor Centre I had to have a peek to see if there were any boats coming through the locks before I could leave.

How excited was I? Rosie & Jim’s barge (officially known as part of the Caledonian Discovery fleet) was coming!

Fort Augustus: Rosie & Jim’s barge approaches the locks on the Caledonian Canal (Caledonian Cruises)

We spent quite a while watching the barge (and a smaller boat) go through all the locks. Thanks to Bruce for allowing me the time to do this. He’d probably just have watched one gate had he been alone! When the barge finally sailed through the final lock complete with the road opening up, we headed for a cuppa, morning successfully passed!

Afternoon, following yet another power nap in the car (me, not him – this is why he drives longer distances), we had a wee jaunt around Drumnadrochit. Heading for Craigmonie woodland we both agreed that a woodland walk can be quite pleasurable, just not 70 miles of it, which was the feeling we had when we walked the Great Glen Way.

The autumnal trees were beautiful with their changing colours and the silver birches were lit up in the afternoon sunshine. A couple of lovely viewpoints showed us the local villages of Milton and Drumnadrochit.

Continuing on we took a minor road to walk up to the Falls of Divach, the only regret being that we couldn’t get up close for photos due to the fence and the drop; that and my refusal to get onto Bruce’s shoulders to take a photo!!

Falls of Divach

Exciting Times!

I blogged a wee while back about having been accepted with a Good For Age time for the London Marathon in 2019. It’s been in the back of my mind as that’s the first training target for next year – keep plodding through the winter in order to hopefully make the start line in half decent shape, although the jury will remain out until we see what winter brings this year before an ‘A’goal marathon decision is made due to Fort William being on the summer hit list.

Anyway, today at lunchtime a colleague mentioned that the ballot results were out. I came home to this:

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I’ve entered the ballot on a few occasions previously (until 2013 when I missed the GFA time unknowingly by 12 seconds as I’d had no idea what the time was) but have had a few years free of disappointment while chasing other goals (such as a sub-20 minute 5k; I’ve done it once and fear it may never be repeated).

Accommodation for London is now booked, as are the flights, and all I need to do now is keep the consistent mileage going over the next few months until training begins in earnest.

Next target is Fraserburgh Half Marathon and then the Turkey Trot 10 mile race in Lossiemouth where the weather will hopefully be kind enough to allow me to bag my middle distance time for a Club Standard in my new age category (V45).

So, exciting times! I love a goal – who else needs a focus to get out there? And more to the point, who else is on the start line?

PIM Crathes Half Marathon

A comfortable time after Fort William, legs suitably recovered, I decided to try Crathes Half. As per last year I didn’t really know what I could achieve, but having turned 45 earlier this month my goal was to get sub 1:41 in the hope that I’ll follow up later in the year with a time to secure my 2nd club standard in this new age bracket. The short distance is in the bag already.

I happily accepted a lift out with clubmate Mike, back from Gran Canaria to run a few races. Thankfully I’d managed to secure his entry after a minor panic last weekend (I had one job!) where the race appeared to have closed before I got his entry confirmed! It appears it was just a glitch in the website and they went on to extend entries for a further few days.

The Metro contingent were out in force today and we met lots of clubmates on arrival, an impressive gathering given all the other runs taking place this weekend!

Metro Aberdeen Running Club do Crathes Half Marathon
The motley crew from Metro Aberdeen – no idea how so many of us managed to avoid looking at the camera!

While others headed off for a warm up, I opted for my usual pre-race routine of jogging to the toilets and joining the revolving queue! It’s amazing how well hydrated you suddenly feel before a race!

Joining the masses on the start line it wasn’t long before the off. I’ll be honest … I found the start somewhat frustrating as it was slow and I had to weave around quite a few people before I could properly get into my stride. Maybe not such a bad thing though all things considered as it is initially up as you leave the castle behind.

Determined not to let my watch dictate the pace I decided to run by feel, occasionally checking that I wasn’t going ridiculously fast as that’s always a danger early on. It felt good to be racing again. I’d been concerned that my speed had dropped in the run up to the marathon so it was good to find that a fast (for me) pace felt okay.

The second mile was downhill and this saw me running faster and passing a few people. Retrospectively, maybe the fast miles two and three were what led to the fatigue later, but at the time it felt good. Hindsight is a great thing in every aspect of life!

The sea of runners gave me something to aim for and I reeled in the odd one here and there, continuing to move steadily through the field. We headed off-road at mile 6 and with the slight descent I loved this bit, picking up pace and feeling like I was storming along. I’d happily run on terrain like that all day!

Going back onto the road was tough and my legs objected slightly, although nowhere nearly as bad as at Dyce Half. It became a bit of a slog here. I’d pushed hard and I still had five miles to go. I reminded myself that in a marathon I’d feel this way and the feeling would pass, doing a quick body scan to try relaxing the tension and focus on what felt good.

The downhill finally returned at mile 10 but I was a little more cautious, wanting to save some energy for the end recalling it being tough in the last mile. My pace was dropping and I was beginning to hurt, but took faith in the knowledge that there was less than a parkrun to go.

The final two miles were hard! My legs were heavy, breathing was not quite so relaxed and I just wanted it to be over! At some point around here I passed Graham who’s usually ahead of me but is battling an injury. Huge thanks to him for the encouragement. He told me there was a prize with my name on it and this just gave me the extra motivation needed to keep pushing.

There was another female, Kay, just ahead of me and I pushed her a bit to see what she had left in the tank. She responded by picking up pace again. This happened another couple of times before I finally caught and went past her. She very sportingly said, ‘well done Clare.’ Despite that I didn’t feel I could relax too much as I was pretty sure she’d be back before long.

I was delighted to finally re-enter the grounds of Crathes Castle knowing that I was on the home straight. I managed to pick up the pace, spurred on by the crowd support (thank you!) and the downhill finish, and was delighted to cross the line with a chip time of 1:36:55. The downside was that it was slightly slower than last year; the upside being that I was first Female Veteran.

Great running by so many people with Metro clubmate Kyle taking 1st prize and setting a new course record. There was also a prize in the Veteran male category for Jamie, with Ali taking the first female prize.

PIM Crathes Half Marathon Medal & 1st Female Veteran Quaich

Great to catch up with everyone post race. Most were happy with their times; a few disappointed. You know who you are: those who are poorly will come back stronger with a bit of rest and recovery, and those who ran well but are unhappy are their own worst critics and need to practise a little self-kindness! Listen to my Mum – she’s always said you can only do your best, and each of us did the best that we could today.

Onwards and upwards, next target for me is Fraserburgh. What about you?

Sunday Fun: Duthie Junior parkrun is 1!

Back in August I had my first experience of Junior parkrun, having the privilege of being the Tail Walker and Run Report Writer. (The run report can be found here: http://www.parkrun.org.uk/duthie-juniors/news/2018/08/06/the-view-from-the-tail-5th-august-run-report-event-45-2/)

So, you can imagine my delight when my Aberdeen Parkrun buddy, Cynthia, asked if I’d be willing to be a Teletubby for the 1st birthday celebration. I was even more delighted when I found out that I could be Po, red being my favourite colour. Alongside Cynthia as Tinky Winky, we had Alison as Dipsy, and Carolyn, also celebrating her own birthday, as Lala. I won’t tell you how old she is as that would be wrong, but let’s just say she doesn’t look it!

Our mission was top secret, a surprise for the youngsters and Cynthia had plotted a cunning plan. After a rendezvous with the other volunteers we’d head up and around the flag pole hill to change before running down for the warm up. We weren’t sure of the reception we’d get as none of us were sure if modern day children would know who the Teletubbies were! This fear was swiftly allayed as a young ‘man’ appeared quietly stating, ‘Over the hills and far away, the Teletubbies come to play!’ as he made his way up to the flagpole.

There followed a little debate as to who should lead the charge before we headed down, waving to the gathering throng of children as we went. High fives and lots of ‘eh ohs’, Carolyn in particular excelling in this. Then it was into the warm up, led by Tammy. There’s a reason why she’s fast, and she led a warm up with great gusto that certainly got our heart rates up and the sweat pouring off us! By the end of our run we all had new found respect for anyone that runs a marathon in fancy dress!

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We agreed on our strategy for the run – we’d do one lap, then cheer everyone home. The youngsters set off, many at a very swift pace, and we bimbled around the park, high fiving the marshals and kids, and waving at everyone we met. This was lots of fun! By the time we were finishing our lap and drawing breath the front runners were coming in!

We clapped and cheered the junior runners home. Spider-Man had some impressive moves in the funnel, and quite a few others were in fancy dress for the birthday party. I decided to head back out, running the course in reverse, and had the pleasure of joining someone on her very first parkrun (accompanied by Dad, I hasten to add) as she’d just come of age for running.

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There was then an opportunity for the adults to run. This was a one-off and not endorsed by parkrun in any way. Tinky Winky and I lasted the two laps (and didn’t come last!) while Dipsy and Lala copped out after one. In her defence, Dipsy does have a gammy knee and probably shouldn’t be running at all at present. What amused us most was that Kyle Grieg was making a guest appearance in his Team GB kit as part of the #teamparkrun event. Having completed the run with the kids it appeared he was no match for Tinky Winky, dropping out near the bottom car park. Go Tinky Winky!! (Let’s not tell her I saw Kyle FLYING on the Deeside Line later in the morning; I honestly don’t think he’d have managed that pace had we not helped him warm up).

More photos, some lovely nibbles (Tinky Winky it seems is rather partial to fruit, while Po can’t resist a bit of cake), we finally had to part with our (sweaty) costumes. Huge thanks to Nik for lending them for the occasion.

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In true parkrun style the day finished in the cafe. Happy Birthday Duthie Juniors! What a great event and so lovely to see you reach the milestone in style! Happy Birthday to Carolyn too – enjoy the celebrations!!

Bennachie and it’s neighbours – lazy Sunday afternoon

Deciding to make the most of the comparatively fine afternoon we decided to head for Bennachie. It’s been a long time since we’ve been here, usually favouring munros or the smaller hills out Deeside way. However, a change can be good and this meant we’d get both an afternoon walk and an evening at home.

There are many routes up Bennachie, as is very evident from the multiple signposts now adorning the hillside! We chose to start our walk at the Rowantree Car Park today which gives a relatively gentle pull up the hill.

Approaching Mither Tap (Bennachie) from Rowantree Car Park

It was a great day for it. The rain from this morning had cleared and there was barely a breath of wind. It’s amazing how quickly you find yourself on the summit when doing a smaller hill!

We sat chatting with another couple for a good while before heading off, then making the decision to do the neighbouring summits of Oxen Craig, higher than Bennachie, but less visited. While looking quite far off there’s a very good path (as there is on all these hills) and it’s a very short hop between them.

We then retraced our steps a little to branch off onto Craig Shannoch before heading back down to join the path back to the Rowantree car park.

A fine afternoon out. The only disappointing thing was the amount of discarded litter we encountered. I wonder if people who leave their water bottles and other junk believe that there’s a refuse collection mid-week? We did out bit for the environment though and in true Womble style carried quite a few pieces off the hill.