Finding New Ways

In my last blog I mentioned feeling a bit bored of the lockdown and the same old routines. I know I’m not alone in that. I’m also beginning to notice more traffic on the roads, more cars in the car parks at the local parks and trails, more people out and about and a greater ignorance around social distancing. This last one is the thing that’s pushing my buttons right now. I have no objection to running on the road to accommodate pedestrians on the pavement, but do get irritated if they don’t acknowledge it in any way. It’s just plain rudeness to ignore someone and does nothing towards teaching good manners to youngsters when families hog the pavement en masse, looking at you as if you have three heads rather than smiling or saying hello. Thankfully not everyone is like this; there’s definitely a great number of people being friendly, exchanging pleasantries or even giving way to others. To those, thank you!

New Trails

I’ve been trying to find new routes to run, becoming a little jaded with what’s now becoming very familiar. During the week I found another single-track trail alongside the River Dee. It was a bit lumpy and bumpy with plenty of roots and boulders. Not ideal for running at any pace, but ultimately I’ve no need to go anywhere fast right now so I enjoyed it for what it was.

Biking

Yesterday, we hit the trails again on our mountain bikes which was fun. I’m really enjoying being out on the bike again and when we’re finally permitted to return to the hills any ride ins will certainly feel easier than they previously would have done!

Trail Finding

While biking, we wondered where some of the wee trails along the route went but lacked the inclination to investigate. In the past, when we were keen bikers, we’d sometimes explore on foot to get a handle on how routes link up and how good they’d be for riding. Not being close enough to Countesswells to do this without the car or the will to be out walking for many hours, I volunteered to run them instead.

Cheating a little, my run began midway up Anderson Drive having bummed a lift from Bruce who was headed for his Mum’s with the essential shopping. Thrown out at the bus stop, I ran a new trail that took me parallel to Kingsgate. In the morning sunshine it was extremely pretty!

Running alongside the burn, popping out to cross a couple of roads, it ended near Hazlehead with the option to continue to the Den of Maidencraig. That’s for another day. Today’s goal was Countesswells via the shortest route.

Hazlehead was relatively quiet. I’ve noticed more people taking to the fairways as this gives a much more open space on which to walk. I’m sure the footfall is no higher than normal, but I do wonder about the impact of kids on their bikes. For the sake of the golfers, I hope everyone’s staying off the greens!

Over to Countesswells, it was a relief to run downhill, my legs feeling a little like running through treacle today. This is largely due to the work I’ve been doing through @Jcru05’s programme, #unlacethebrace. I know that in the longer term this will ease and the benefits will pay off so I just need to embrace the discomfort and fatigue for now. If anyone is interested in learning more, there’s also an E-book available: https://payhip.com/Physiorun, well worth a look!

I opted to run straight down the fire road; the most direct route to the area I wanted to explore. There’s a lovely swooping section through the trees when you come off Kingshill, but further along there’s a section that gets slower due to a good descent with a subsequent ninety degree turn to go uphill. I ran the reverse of my usual route, surprised by the initial incline. I always thought it was virtually flat coming off this section and back towards the fire road; it transpires it’s not.

Back down the fire road, I followed another single-track path up from our usual trail. Again, this was not quite so much fun and I found it particularly hard going with my heavy legs. While it would be rideable, it was a wee bit more technical and definitely more of an effort, leading back to the other path I’d been on. It allowed me to link up to the usual route again, providing another piece in the puzzle. Those that know me (and my distinct lack of directional sense) will be suitably impressed, I’m sure!

Homeward Bound

Leaving Countesswells, I took the opportunity to try another route we’ve seen folks coming down. This took me along a wee road in the first instance, then up a single-track path through a field. Definitely another one that would be fun on the descent. I’m pretty certain that on the return leg I’ll stick to the gradual ascent and follow the gate to gate section.

Having been advised by a biker I got chatting to that Hazlehead was now horrendously busy, I stayed off the beaten track for as long as possible, following the horsey trails instead. Down to Den Wood, I then cut along the trail to Walker Dam where I was delighted to see some ducklings!

Just over 11 miles in the legs by the time I reached home. My waterproof jacket stayed in my rucksack and I found some fun new routes. I’d call that a win!

 

Be Grateful of the Small Things

Biking

Today was a stunning day. We’ve been truly blessed with the weather thus far during our ‘confinement’, and it was a joy to be out on the trails again today.

Riding out from home, it’s not long before we reach Hazlehead. I love being able to ride across to Countesswells, a favourite running route ordinarily. I’ve managed to the old ‘stables’ but the full route is a step or two (several miles) too far.

On our social Sunday runs we have regular stops to allow everyone the opportunity to regroup. One such stop is our ‘selfie spot’, so in keeping with tradition Bruce and I have taken pictures there on the couple of occasions we’ve been out.

The solitude of the trails is remarkable with so few people out. The car park closed, people are welcome only if they can get there under their own steam.

Reflections

Home and showered I reflected upon the day thus far and decided to look back on previous years to see what I’d been doing then. Way back in December 2014 I decided to start keeping a journal of things I’m grateful for, noting three positives each day. These are often small, relatively insignificant things but the reflection provides some clear light at the end of each day, all the more so during life’s tough times.

Here they are with some annotations along the way:

15th April 2015

1. Relaxed morning in Keswick (Easter holidays – I wonder if it was raining; ‘relaxed mornings’ don’t usually figure in our hols!)

2. Lovely walk with Bruce & Rob (Rob is one of Bruce’s friends and I recall he’d driven some way to join us for a walk)

3. Post walk beers and chat

15th April 2016

1. Last 3 Wainwrights: Ling Fell, Sale Fell, then on to Binsey! (I should clarify that these were the last 3 Wainwrights of OUR holiday; still a long way to go overall!)

2. Home – although I enjoy being away I’m always happy to be home again.

3. Chat with Mum & Dad

15th April 2017

1. parkrun fun as Run Director

2. Nuart walk around Aberdeen with Bruce followed by a visit to CASC

3. Dinner catch up at Dizzy’s with Elaine, Heidi & Jacq – we need to get together when this is all over, although with one in USA and Dizzy’s sadly no longer standing we’ll need a new venue.

15th April 2018

1. Social run (Quite possibly around the trails we did today)

2. Coffee at Cognito – a post run tradition and a place I’m missing very much right now!

3. Trip to Stonehaven for ice cream – probably Aunty Betty’s; I’ve since discovered E Giulianotti (up the hill from the Square) that does equally good ice cream and has less of a queue!)

15th April 2019

1. Happy boys after the holidays – Easter holidays are a moveable feast. One of the joys of working as a teacher is that the kids are generally happy to return; you can’t fail to be swept up in their enthusiasm.

2. More fudge sold – this was part of my fundraising efforts for the London Marathon last year.

3. Sarah – home to a clean house. I work full-time and am a part-time ‘athlete’. What more can I say?

Have you found any small pleasures during the ‘lockdown’? What are you grateful for?

Frustrating times: a niggling injury

Over the last few months I’ve developed a niggling injury: my heel hurts and has a ‘knot’ under the fleshy pad. In honesty, I probably first noticed it when I started tapering for the marathon back at the end of April. I hadn’t felt it previously despite regular running. It was nothing major so I ignored it and hoped it would go away.

Fast forward a couple of months and the bony bit on my big toe frequently began to join the party post running, although the heel remained no more than a tiny niggle in the mornings. A trip to physio and podiatry suggested it could be to do with alignment, so a silicone toe separator was fashioned and did seem to sort that out. The heel pain however continued to rumble on quietly in the background. Not enough to be bothersome as it eased on walking around in the morning, just there on occasion.

Sadly over the last month or two it’s gotten worse. I’ve had to cut back my mileage significantly and I’ve binned some racing plans due to my ever decreasing fitness. Extremely frustrating!

I’m trying to see positives where I can. I’m working on strength training more, something that’s gone by the wayside during more intense training periods, I’m going to Pilates regularly as I have for many years, and I’m running easy miles when I can.

Being on my feet for much of the day at work doesn’t help. I’m trying to do plenty of stretching, icing, spiky balling, and all of the other things recommended by the most recent physio visit. Pain relief doesn’t seem to help. Not sure that the sorbathane heel pads are doing much good either. The first steps in the morning are the worst, struggling to weight bear until I’ve been up a wee while. Running doesn’t make it worse which is good, but it does seem to niggle more post run.

I think I’m in this for the long term. Fingers crossed I’ll come out the other side in time for marathon training to start again at the turn of the year. Until then it’s continue stretching, rolling, icing and healing.

On positives, one thing that does keep my spirits up is the Sunday social run around the local trails. As long as I can keep doing this I know all is not lost. A steady 10 miles in the bank again today. Thanks to my Sunday chums for the company and chat.

What are your top tips for staying positive during ‘off’ periods?
Any tips on maintaining fitness if unable to run as much?

Racing for the fun of it: Peace Coaches Metro Dyce Half Marathon

The Metro Dyce Half Marathon (alongside the Metro Beach 10k in June) being our club’s bread and butter, it’s encouraged that we either run or help out. I’d swithered as to which was the best option but having had a few enjoyable recovery runs since the marathon I made the decision mid-week to throw my hat in the ring and run. I’d never intended to race as I wasn’t sure how recovered my legs were but there’s this thing of putting on the Metro vest and something happening in my mind/body; I just can’t help but put my race head on and try harder.

Not the best preparation, I decided to make fudge yesterday for the post-run spread. I’ve got this down to a fine art so that was no bother. The bit I struggled with was the white chocolate peanut butter balls. The recipe made it sound so easy! The recipe, however, is from a charity cookbook and I wonder if the lady who wrote it down missed out an ingredient! There was no way I was rolling anything into balls! A few more tablespoons of peanut butter and a splash or two of water later I finally managed. A couple of extra hours on my feet standing in the kitchen, plans to do my ironing, hoover etc were put to one side as by this point said kitchen looked a little like it had exploded!

However, the morning of my ‘fun’ run arrived and for once I was outside and ready when Alan stopped off to pick me up. He was most impressed. This was a first, and quite possibly a last too, hence it being noteworthy. We headed over to Dyce and were greeted by various friendly faces directing us to the parking area. More friendly faces appeared in the car park in the form of clubmates and parkrunners. Always a joy to see friends at races.

Heading for registration we got our numbers on and I secured the cooler weather by putting on my suncream. Having vitiligo I can never be too careful and have maintained my pale complexion well despite the heat this summer.

Lots of Metro vests were dotted around the registration point and outside warming up. Eventually I decided I probably should have some semblance of a warm up, aside from working my jaws with all the chat, and headed out to do some dynamic stretching (hope you’re reading this Helen!) and two laps of the field to get my legs moving. Weirdly, my legs felt very leaden and heavy at this point. Figured it didn’t matter as the plan had always been to run the first couple of miles and then drop back if need be.

Lining up alongside Alan I was a little concerned that we were awfully far forward again! It’s funny how at some races nobody wants to get too close to the start while at others you need to work your way through the throngs. A quick race briefing followed and then we were off, round the field and out onto the old Formantine and Buchan railway line. The first part of the route is on tarmac pavement and is slightly downhill. It’s a fast start and we went quicker than planned; always a danger doing this on a longer run as it usually means you suffer later! I was conscious of not wishing to slow down people behind us and having felt someone clip my forefoot when it was behind me I ducked in ahead of Alan as there was no space to drop back due to the proximity of others.

The changes to the route with the roadworks were not too traumatic and I settled into my run, the earlier leg heaviness having left me. I was a little concerned that I was maybe going a little too fast but figured it didn’t matter at the end of the day. This run was not about chasing times; instead, running as I felt and most importantly enjoying it.

Settling into the run, it wasn’t long before the first minor road crossing was reached and again, it was great to see friendly faces here and receive support – thank you! The water station was manned by clubmates and again, plenty of encouragement was shouted which was very much appreciated.

Further along I appeared to cause hilarity at the second water station by shouting a cheery, ‘Good morning!’ From the laughter that ensued I’m guessing that’s not up there in the top 10 high frequency exchanges. This party station was staffed by the lovely Fit Like Joggers and Metro alike. It was great to see the purple FLJ gazebo and hear their music as I approached.

Further along I started to see the return of the first runners. The lead runner was way out in front along with Roy on lead bike, and I really appreciated the vocal support offered by him (Roy that is)! The faster folks then started coming pretty quickly with Claire leading up the ladies. I’m sure I’ve said it before but I do love an out and back course. I really enjoy seeing the speedier people and marvelling at the apparent ease of their running.

The miles ticking away nicely and legs feeling pretty good, I now figured I should just keep on going as I was to get to halfway. Once again it was lovely to see a familiar face, Dino snapping away at the halfway turn.

Peace Coaches Metro Dyce Half Marathon
Thanks to Dino Roussais for the halfway turn photo!

From here I resolved to try and pick the pace up further knowing that the course is gradually downhill. I slowly started picking off the odd runner as I went. One or two commented that I’d found a new gear, my response being that I had no idea how long it’d last! Thankfully I was able to continue strongly, passing one or two others as I did so. Reaching the road crossing again I was very grateful to the marshals as I timed it to perfection to coincide with a taxi coming down the road. Thankfully the driver opted to be courteous and hold back, allowing me to cross without breaking my stride. I may not have been able to get up the slope at the other side had I stopped.

Not much further along I started to see the buildings on the outskirts of Dyce and knew by both this and my watch that I was nearly ‘home’. I was prepared for the slight incline to the finish, but what I wasn’t prepared for was the transition from trail to tarmac. I couldn’t believe how this affected my legs, honestly feeling like my shoes were stuck to the pavement as I tried to lift my feet on every stride. Fortunately this was relatively short-lived, although it felt like an eternity, and it wasn’t long before I reached the field in which the run finishes. A quick skirt around the perimeter led me to the finish with shouts and cheers of encouragement along the way. I was most delighted to receive my medal, water and banana, and even a can of beer.

Crashing out on the grass alongside clubmates, we exchanged stories of how our runs had panned out, cheering others in, before retreating to the Scout Hut for a fine spread and lots more chat. The prize giving later took place. Overall winners were Jason Kelly (also of Stonehaven) and Claire Bruce of Metro Aberdeen who ran another brilliant time. Meanwhile, I was both surprised and delighted to find that I’d ranked as 3rd Female Veteran, following behind the every awesome Hazel Wyness of Metro Aberdeen in 1st place and Ann Gallon of Stonehaven in 2nd. Full results are available here: http://www.metroaberdeen.co.uk

As always, thanks to the organisers and volunteers for doing our club proud!

A weekend of running and the Metro Beach 10k

The marathon training’s going pretty well so I was looking forward to the Metro Beach 10k – it’s fast, flat, and usually by the time evening comes the wind along the prom has died down. This unfortunately was not the case last night …

My legs were tired from the weekend’s running. The long run has a nasty habit of hanging around in the background like a bad smell, so I opted to get it out of the way on Friday evening, heading up to Hazlehead on my own, and running solo 2 miles up the road, through Hazlehead, over to Countesswells, 4 loops of Kingshill, the hill at the other side and an extra bit on the flatter terrain before heading back home via Hazlehead once again. To say it was warm is somewhat of an understatement. On the upside though, the run was done. It was one of those character building efforts – what started off feeling easy ended up feeling rather tough.

Saturday saw me hit Aberdeen parkrun. To begin with I wasn’t sure whether my legs would be able to run at all so I opted to walk up round the bend on my warm up run. At this point I reasoned with my body and concluded that a slow shuffle may be an option, so did manage a warm up effort, then was most delighted to meet my sister which meant that we could run together, chat all the way around, and really not think about the miles that are Aberdeen parkrun. She’s getting better – the pace noticeably picked up on the home straight!

Aberdeen parkrun

Then on Sunday I’d contemplated a lie in but the body clock woke me in time to meet the Metro social gang. Once again, we hit the trails at Hazlehead and Countesswells for varying distances. I decided to opt out with Ali and do the 10 mile route (only one lap of Kingshill) as my legs were weary and didn’t fancy venturing around a second time. This also ensured that I’d have suficient time for my post run coffee at Cognito at the Cross before venturing up to Huntly to see Mum and Dad for lunch. Win win!

So, back to the 10k. I ran it last year (and have only just looked back at the diary to find I did it in 43:15). I don’t recall there being any wind then so hopefully that’s what I can attribute to the slowing this year. I went out with the intention of warming up for two miles. However, it was very windy, so I bailed and decided I’d just head out for a jolly and forget about the time. Anyone that knows me will also know that this was never truly going to be the case – the Metro vest was on so this does mean business.

The start was somewhat larger than previous years and everyone was ahead of the start line before having to move backwards. It’s been a long time since I’ve felt so hemmed in during a race! I think the last time was Paris Marathon where I was surrounded by tall people and couldn’t see a thing. Suffice to say, I was relieved when we set off and the crowd started to thin out a little.

The headwind along the upper prom was tough, but the legs were fresh at this point (surprisingly so). Before long the Stones marshals were reached and it was a sheer joy to hit the lower prom with no wind! What a blast it was running freely along here, probably why it felt all the harder when we reached the Footdee turn and hit the headwind again!

The second stretch along the upper prom from Footdee all the way to the Stones was brutal! I honestly felt like I was going backwards (and in terms of time I was). However, as with elsewhere on the course it was lovely to hear shouts of support from the marshals (Bryan, the FLJs/Metros) and other friends and clubmates. By this point I think the best you got was a grimace, so please know that your support truly was appreciated!

The final stretch along the lower prom to the finish was again wind free and it was here that I was able to truly relax and enjoy the run. I was delighted to be feeling strong, both in mind and body, and very happy to complete the run in a time of 43:49. I went in with no idea of where I was at and ran faster than I have in any training session to date – so far the marathon training has focused on Endurance and Lactate Threshold. The next part is Race Preparation – wish me luck!

A little addendum: many thanks to everyone that supported our cause last night by buying fudge. Much appreciated! Alongside my work colleagues, you’ve supported me in banking £100 for our charities!

White Chocolate Fudge for Metro Coast to Coast Fundraising

Should anyone wish to donate further, please visit our Total Giving page:https://www.totalgiving.co.uk/mypage/metrocoast2coast

Trac Run Balmoral 15 Mile Trail Race

This year I decided to enter the Balmoral 15 mile race on a whim as it fitted with my marathon plan (which specified a 15 mile long run). It’s always good to run somewhere different and given that I’ve only done this race once before, way back in 2012 when I found it very tough, I decided to give it a bash.

I’d planned a leisurely drive out to allow plenty of time for parking and walking to the start. Given the fine weather that we’ve had I had no doubts about clothing – shorts and vest all the way. Fine in principle, most unlike me though as I usually have various options packed just in case, ultimately opting for shorts and vest after dithering for considerable time, and I did start to question my decision as the temperature started to drop on the way out the road and a few spots of rain began to fall on the windscreen.

It proved to be chillier than expected while waiting for the start and I was therefore delighted to avail myself of the shelter offered by the Fit Like Joggers tent. Thanks David for the hospitality! This lovely group are going from strength to strength – it’s so good to see!

I also bumped into Kirsty, fellow Metro runner, who kindly gave me a spare pair of gloves to keep my hands warm until the start. Very much appreciated!

Trac 15 Mile Trail Race, Run Balmoral

Time passes quickly when chatting, and with a few fellow Metro runners around it didn’t feel long before the call up to the start line. As the toilet queue had taken longer than anticipated, this resulted in a quick dash to dump my bag at the FLJ tent with not much time to think about anything else – no bad thing as I still sometimes find myself on a start line wondering why I’m there.

Trac Balmoral 15 Mile Trail Race
Thanks to McGarva Photography for the photographs: http://www.pbase.com/mcgarva

The route heads straight out on a tarmac road, progressing to fire roads and land rover tracks. My overall aim was to run faster than my previous attempt (2:21) and ideally around 2:15. I’m not one for doing races as training runs – if the Metro vest has a number on it I’m racing! However, I had to be mindful of the fact that last time I ran 15 miles was, I think, in The Illuminator.

I’m a bit vague on the detail of the race, but I can recall loving it most of the way. The trails were good, the weather was kind with some sun now and then, and the wind didn’t have any adverse effect. For much of the run I was smiling, both inside and out.

The climb up towards Lochnagar was not the climb I experienced last time: more miles in the legs, consistency of training, and a lot more hill walking have contributed to better leg strength and overall endurance. I have to say, I was very surprised when I rounded a corner to find that I had done most of the ascent.

Strava Profile, Trac 15 Mile Trail Race, Run Balmoral

There was a wee bit of everything on the route: tarmac, fire roads, landrover tracks (stony and grassy), and a wee bit of single track to keep you on your toes.

The descent was fast. Having been disappointed at The Illuminator to lose quite a few places on the descent I’d determined to better my skills, the geek in me leading to YouTube, and viewing had suggested using the arms to balance and allowing gravity to do the work. I put this into practice, and combined with being able to see the trail ahead, better than in the dark, it did improve my descent times. Exchanging pleasantries with another runner I commented that we were now less than a parkrun from the finish.

As promised, there was then the sting in the tail at around 13 miles. I’m sure this wasn’t as hard as it felt, but the ascent here felt tough.

I was breathing hard, which I hadn’t been until this point, and it took all my determination to keep running;on the upside, there wasn’t a stream of people passing me so we must all have felt the same! Finally, a steep descent saw us drop back down to the tarmac road and from there the finish was in sight – a very welcome sight it was too!

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Lovely to receive the vocal Metro support on the approach to the finish – thank you! The announcement of all the runners crossing the line also adds to the special finish. Water, medal and t-shirt collected it was then time to congratulate my fellow runners and head back out to cheer others in.

Run Balmoral, 21st Event

Huge congratulations to everyone that completed the Devil of Deeside – two events on Saturday (5k & 10k) followed by the Duathalon & 15 mile run today (Sunday); you’re all superhuman!

Finally, thanks to everyone that helped to organise or volunteered today; your support and encouragement along the way was most welcome!

Official time: 2:01:35

Pretty delighted with that – thanks to my Dad for highlighting that this is in fact a PB! The rarity of the 15 mile race experience meant I’d not quite registered that! A great day out; hopefully I’ll Run Balmoral again before another six years passes.

Marathon Training Begins …

Having lacked focus since dropping out of Fraserburgh Half Marathon (in favour of going away to celebrate Mum’s 70th birthday), I decided that I needed a focus, and have therefore made the decision to follow an 18 week training plan in the lead up to Fort William Marathon.

The year got off to a reasonable start with steady miles, but for four weeks I’ve done little or nothing (3 weeks with 7 or 8 miles a week, then a complete rest last week). The upshot is that I am focused and raring to go, at least in my head. I’m hoping the body will follow suit shortly.

I love a plan and favour Pfitzinger and Douglas. I’ve used the plans from the P & D Advanced Marathoning book for my last two marathons and therefore decided to stick with it. This will be a new venture, following the 18 week, up to 55 miles, plan, as previously I’ve done 12 weeks or less. That’s been on top of decent base mileage though, something I feel I’m lacking this time.

IMG_3578

The first mesocycle is all about building endurance which is exactly what I need to do just now. Despite it being a shock to the system I have enjoyed my runs this week. As with all plans, it adapts to fit around life quite nicely, so I ended up doing two runs at the start of the week and two this weekend.

Monday night saw a lactate threshold session, with four of the miles at half marathon pace. Given that this pace was last used in February for Kinloss to Lossiemouth Half it was a bit of an effort to get there and hold it, but I did it. Tuesday saw a far more sedate affair with a lovely session on the Deeside line with Ali and Alan. It’s so good to be able to get back out in the evenings and see some daylight!

Yesterday was a recovery run. Conditions were perfect at Aberdeen parkrun and there were lots of personal bests recorded, including those of my sister and niece. Very well done to them both. I thoroughly enjoyed my run with them, although the younger of the two did try to escape, managing to get a few seconds clear and holding this to the finish, spurred on by her auntie hollering encouragement from behind along with an alert that her mum was starting to pick the pace up on the final stretch.

The legs felt a bit weary as we set off today from Hazlehead. There were five of us to begin, two intending on doing a shorter distance. Conditions were perfect, hardly a breath of wind, and the sun was shining brightly with a wee touch of ground frost remaining due to the clocks having changed. I love the peace and tranquility of running in this area, and it was particularly noticeable running round Kings Hill where the birds could be heard singing in the trees. As always, time passed quickly with the chat along the way, and before I knew it I’d been round Kings Hill twice and was on the way back to Hazlehead. As is traditional, the run ended with coffee, by this time we were a twosome, and had timed it to perfection, hitting Cognito at a quiet moment.

Therein ends Week 1: 34.88 miles and one session of Pilates. I’ve got the plan for Week 2 written through the diary but am not looking further ahead than that. I know what’s in store and will just take it week by week, run by run.

Listen to your body!

They say the body is very intuitive; I’ve been told by the physiotherapist in the past that I have good body awareness. Thus, if it’s talking to me by expressing soreness or a niggle, I have no qualms about taking an extra rest day.

I frequently find myself reminding others that rest is your friend. In order to perform well and avoid breaking down you do need to allow your muscles to recover, especially after a hard workout or run.

Touch wood, this self-care surely must be part of the reason why I’m rarely injured (possibly alongside the monthly massage I’ve enjoyed since 2008)! I may at times be too in touch with my body. It often suggests taking a break to enjoy a glass of wine on the sofa, or stopping off for coffee and cake on the way home rather than enduring a soaking on a miserable winter’s night.

And so, through listening intuitively the yoga ‘streak’ ended on Thursday. I have managed 31 consecutive days of yoga (in addition to weekly Pilates and some running), but found myself increasingly tired this week, probably due to the germs that are being readily shared at work, and by the time I reached home last night my body was ready to rest.

A poor excuse for a Friday night, I slobbed on the sofa watching catch up TV before getting an early night. No parkrun today as I’m feeling a little under the weather still. Instead, I have spent some time on the yoga mat – the practice will continue – and I am going to nourish both body and mind by lunching out with friends.

Hopefully a day of rest will see me fit for the trails tomorrow but time will tell.

Has your body spoken to you recently? What did it say?

Volunteering (and a lack of motivation!)

Happiest outdoors or not, having volunteered at Stonehaven parkrun this morning I was somewhat frozen and lacking any motivation to go running outdoors this afternoon so headed inside for the ‘dreadmill’ instead.

I’ve been struggling to find the motivation to run of late. Darkness and cold are not great motivators and today’s session has been hanging over me like a dark cloud of dread, knowing my fitness is not where it once was, and having a lactate threshold session to address. In the end I was pleasantly surprised to find that although the session was hard it was doable having re-evaluated my training paces. There may be hope for me yet!

Yoga has been going well and I’ve succeeded in keeping my daily practice going for 13 days so far. Give me daily yoga over a run streak any day!

Back to the volunteering …

Having enjoyed my run at Stonehaven last week I had offered my services to volunteer this week and was given the role of Timekeeper. In my experience timekeeping is one of the more challenging roles to fill at parkrun. People are scared they may mess it up and this is why most parkruns have two timekeepers. Ultimately it’s a free run and there are far worse things that can happen in life – there’s always next week! Oh, and the timers are very visual and remarkably easy to operate.

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An impressive amount of first timers showed up for the Briefing 👍 Stonehaven are keen to encourage both walkers and runners to join them on Saturday mornings.

All went smoothly today and I was fortunate in having the joy of chatting to fellow volunteers, Alison and Alex, throughout. It’s amazing how time passes when you’re having a good blether. Alison was the smiley marshal from the top of the hill last week and is frustratingly injured at present, so I wish her a speedy recovery back to full strength.

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One of the lovely thing about a multi-lap course is the opportunity to cheer the runners as they pass 👏

Onwards, Terryanne’s Cafe at the Bowling Club saw us warmed up with coffee and chat, always a great finish to parkrun.

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The finish line gathering

If you’ve ever fancied trying parkrun please give it a go! The sense of community and friendliness has been evident at each of the runs I’ve done and it’s something special to be part of this truly amazing community.