The Last 16: 2 Weeks To Go!

Today was the last 16 mile run of the plan. This sounds okay, particularly if you’re a Hanson devotee. However, theit’s the second of only two 16 mile runs. I’ve squeezed in a 15 and a 14, but the reality is that the training is not what is should have been. This is the problem with spur of the moment decisions. I’m sure at some point during the virtual race I’ll find myself wishing I’d stuck to my guns regarding deferral!

Reflections on Training

Last marathon block (London 2019), I seriously committed to training, running 750 miles in the build up to the race, and this fared me well. For the virtual attempt this year, my annual mileage has just nudged past this (we’re in September, London 2019 was in April!) with a measly 420 miles in training over the last 14 weeks. Weekly mileage has topped out at 45 mpw with only 5 runs, as opposed to 55 mpw with 6 runs per week. On the upside, I’ve incorporated strength training this cycle and physically feel I’ve benefited from this.

Bottom line, I knew what I was getting into and need to be realistic about what I can achieve.

Fuelling the Long Run

I decided today to run a flatter route for a change, my longer runs usually on the forest trails. I’ve been experimenting with new gels – Huma – having pretty much tried everything else on the market over the years, and figured it might be an idea to stay closer to civilisation in case they didn’t agree with me. As it transpired they did the business with no ill effects. Having taken one before leaving the house, and two more at 30 minutes and an hour respectively, I felt secure enough to leave Duthie Park, where I’d been running laps and suffering the consequences of boredom, to head out the Deeside Line. A fourth gel further out the line saw me consume what should hopefully be enough to get me through the distance in a couple of weeks time.

No sooner had I started out the line than I bumped into the Mackies. The line was busy, lots of walkers and cyclists along the route, quietening down as I moved further out from the park.

Having gone right out to the AWPR, I bumped into another familiar face, enjoying the sunshine and views over the countryside. Having stopped for a blether, I made a mental note that standing still for 5 minutes mid-run does nothing for my legs. It was a real struggle to persuade them to go again!

Autumn Approaches

While beautiful to see some of the trees beginning to change, some autumnal colours in the leaves, I found it a little sad. This year, I’m sure many will agree, feels to quite some extent like it’s been stolen. There have been so many occasions missed and little social contact with family and friends. To realise that, despite the glorious September sunshine, the days will soon draw in as winter approaches is not a positive thought.

Taper Time

However, before any of that, I have a couple of weeks of rest and recuperation to look forward to, with a long weekend thrown in for good measure. Never looking more than a week ahead having chosen my plan, it fills me with joy to realise that the runs this week are predominantly easy miles, even if I do feel like I’m ‘cheating’ by tapering after such a short plan. No amount of hard work now will make the ‘race’ any better; all I can do is trust in the training and hope my body remembers what it needs to do.

So, easy miles, rest, sleep and recovery. Two weeks to go until the virtual marathon. I may even be a tad excited.

5 Weeks To Go!

The abbreviated training plan is going well thus far – I’ve completed 2 weeks of it – and I have to say that I’m enjoying my renewed focus. Without the luxury of a full 16-18 weeks for training, I sought advice from the group at LHR Running Community, a Facebook group focusing on training the Hanson way. Luke Humphrey (author of the book, Hanson Marathon Method) was kind enough to reply directly to my question of how to proceed with training, suggesting that realistically the aim would be to finish – it’s not going to be a PB run – and I should aim to increase my mileage to 45 miles per week.

Final Surge Training Plan

Next thing to do was find a plan to support this. Since running a successful London Marathon in 2019 off an LHR plan, I decided this was as good a place as any to start. A little more digging online and I came across an 8 week plan on Final Surge.

Not quite sure that at 30 miles per week I’d have described myself as near my peak mileage, but the other bits resonated with me in that I’d been doing regular workouts over a month. Overall, it looked like following this plan would be achievable, completion the goal, and time largely irrelevant. If I am able to walk the day following the marathon that will be an added bonus!

Progress To Date

Last week saw me run a fraction off 39 miles, this week just short of 42. I plan to add a mile onto my easy run tomorrow and make the warm up on my workouts 2 miles, rather than the planned 1, in order to hit 45 miles next week. I’m also continuing to work on strength training with a running focus so hope that this will also help overall.

It’s been suggested that running a virtual marathon will be hard due to the solitary element. I’m hoping it won’t be any worse than the virtual 5k I did back at the end of June where I ended up walking! While I’m sure there will be ups and downs, aside from last weekend when I ran with two friends, I’ve been training alone since lockdown began in March. I won’t have the support to keep pushing through the tough times, but I have developed the mental strength to be in my own head for a prolonged period of time.

Running Solo

One of the main joys I’ve found in solo running is doing it at a time that suits. Today I allowed myself the luxury of a lie in, starting out at the leisurely time of 10:30 am. While this meant I’d missed the opportunity of company it allowed me additional rest and recovery time, vitally important in the throes of solid training.

I ran a steady 14 miles on the local trails. I had contemplated running somewhere flat but couldn’t think of anywhere inspiring to do this, so the usual stomping ground it was. When you stop to look around it’s easy to understand why this is a favourite.

Looking Ahead

This week holds easy miles, a session of short reps, a tempo run and a 16 mile long run to round it all off. That’s as far ahead as I’m going. One week at a time!

A Moment of Madness?

Due to injury at the tail end of the year, I deferred my place in the 2020 London Marathon. Then COVID struck, the marathon was postponed, and a new date set for October 2020. I deferred as I hadn’t planned to run a marathon in 2019.

So, what on earth possessed me, when the e-mail dropped in this week offering a virtual marathon place to think this was a good idea?

Virtual Training Begins

It would be great if it really was virtual training. Sadly it’s not. I now need to do some serious hard work.

I’ve been training regularly for the last 5 weeks with a regular 30 miles per week, having signed up for a virtual training camp online. This was led by 3 amazing coaches (Nikki Humphrey, Melissa Johnson-White and Dani Filipek) and I trained ‘alongside’ a great group of women. It helped me find my mojo, build in some regular strength training, something I tend to neglect, and get back into a regular running routine.

Moving forward, my next steps are to incorporate higher mileage by steadily increasing my runs and adding in some more marathon specific pace workouts, although I don’t intend to target this pace on ‘race’ day.

I don’t have a marathon time target. I’m more thinking of enjoying the training, getting away for a day as I don’t want to run round the local streets and having a great day out somewhere I love, enjoying the challenge for what it is: FUN!

Long Runs

Today I figured I should up the long run and decided to try 15 miles. It went surprisingly well. I enjoyed my run, mainly on the trails and met lots of friendly faces from the local running community.

It might have been a little harder had I not spent so much time blethering. However, this may be the way the virtual marathon goes too and that’s all good! The current plan is to cover the distance in a leisurely manner, stop as and when I feel like it, and maybe even practise for the ultra that’s calling my name in the future by having a cuppa and a bit of cake along the way!

Wish me luck! I’ll keep you posted.

Finding New Ways

In my last blog I mentioned feeling a bit bored of the lockdown and the same old routines. I know I’m not alone in that. I’m also beginning to notice more traffic on the roads, more cars in the car parks at the local parks and trails, more people out and about and a greater ignorance around social distancing. This last one is the thing that’s pushing my buttons right now. I have no objection to running on the road to accommodate pedestrians on the pavement, but do get irritated if they don’t acknowledge it in any way. It’s just plain rudeness to ignore someone and does nothing towards teaching good manners to youngsters when families hog the pavement en masse, looking at you as if you have three heads rather than smiling or saying hello. Thankfully not everyone is like this; there’s definitely a great number of people being friendly, exchanging pleasantries or even giving way to others. To those, thank you!

New Trails

I’ve been trying to find new routes to run, becoming a little jaded with what’s now becoming very familiar. During the week I found another single-track trail alongside the River Dee. It was a bit lumpy and bumpy with plenty of roots and boulders. Not ideal for running at any pace, but ultimately I’ve no need to go anywhere fast right now so I enjoyed it for what it was.

Biking

Yesterday, we hit the trails again on our mountain bikes which was fun. I’m really enjoying being out on the bike again and when we’re finally permitted to return to the hills any ride ins will certainly feel easier than they previously would have done!

Trail Finding

While biking, we wondered where some of the wee trails along the route went but lacked the inclination to investigate. In the past, when we were keen bikers, we’d sometimes explore on foot to get a handle on how routes link up and how good they’d be for riding. Not being close enough to Countesswells to do this without the car or the will to be out walking for many hours, I volunteered to run them instead.

Cheating a little, my run began midway up Anderson Drive having bummed a lift from Bruce who was headed for his Mum’s with the essential shopping. Thrown out at the bus stop, I ran a new trail that took me parallel to Kingsgate. In the morning sunshine it was extremely pretty!

Running alongside the burn, popping out to cross a couple of roads, it ended near Hazlehead with the option to continue to the Den of Maidencraig. That’s for another day. Today’s goal was Countesswells via the shortest route.

Hazlehead was relatively quiet. I’ve noticed more people taking to the fairways as this gives a much more open space on which to walk. I’m sure the footfall is no higher than normal, but I do wonder about the impact of kids on their bikes. For the sake of the golfers, I hope everyone’s staying off the greens!

Over to Countesswells, it was a relief to run downhill, my legs feeling a little like running through treacle today. This is largely due to the work I’ve been doing through @Jcru05’s programme, #unlacethebrace. I know that in the longer term this will ease and the benefits will pay off so I just need to embrace the discomfort and fatigue for now. If anyone is interested in learning more, there’s also an E-book available: https://payhip.com/Physiorun, well worth a look!

I opted to run straight down the fire road; the most direct route to the area I wanted to explore. There’s a lovely swooping section through the trees when you come off Kingshill, but further along there’s a section that gets slower due to a good descent with a subsequent ninety degree turn to go uphill. I ran the reverse of my usual route, surprised by the initial incline. I always thought it was virtually flat coming off this section and back towards the fire road; it transpires it’s not.

Back down the fire road, I followed another single-track path up from our usual trail. Again, this was not quite so much fun and I found it particularly hard going with my heavy legs. While it would be rideable, it was a wee bit more technical and definitely more of an effort, leading back to the other path I’d been on. It allowed me to link up to the usual route again, providing another piece in the puzzle. Those that know me (and my distinct lack of directional sense) will be suitably impressed, I’m sure!

Homeward Bound

Leaving Countesswells, I took the opportunity to try another route we’ve seen folks coming down. This took me along a wee road in the first instance, then up a single-track path through a field. Definitely another one that would be fun on the descent. I’m pretty certain that on the return leg I’ll stick to the gradual ascent and follow the gate to gate section.

Having been advised by a biker I got chatting to that Hazlehead was now horrendously busy, I stayed off the beaten track for as long as possible, following the horsey trails instead. Down to Den Wood, I then cut along the trail to Walker Dam where I was delighted to see some ducklings!

Just over 11 miles in the legs by the time I reached home. My waterproof jacket stayed in my rucksack and I found some fun new routes. I’d call that a win!

 

Life in Lockdown

The Daily Grind

If I’m honest, at times I’m starting to get a bit fed up of the ‘lockdown’. Being back at work after the ‘holidays’ where I enjoyed having lots of free time, I’m now working 3 days from home / 2 days in school. While some semblance of normality is good, it’s frustrating not being able to see family and friends and having no concept of when this may be feasible. The daily routine is now all too familiar and there are limited possibilities to do something different.

On the other hand, I do consider myself fortunate to have a beautiful garden to enjoy and the good health required to escape the confines of home to enjoy the outdoor spaces close by. I appreciate that not everyone is as fortunate.

Biking Adventures

Yesterday we took our old singlespeed bikes out for a change. We followed the usual route around Hazlehead and Countesswells, not certain at the outset whether Kingshill would feature. In the event we were pleasantly surprised by our burgeoning bike fitness and decided to give the aforementioned hill a bash. Riding clipless pedals, once you’ve committed you keep going – or fall off. My heart was thundering by the time I reached the top with every ounce of weight required for the final couple of pedal turns. Bruce advised that next time I should try zig-zagging towards the top as it makes the effort easier; either that or falling off less hazardous!

Anti-Social Sunday

Sunday is usually Social Sunday – a large group of friends meeting up to run the trails. Sadly, for now this can’t happen, so today was anti-social Sunday instead. I love the Countesswells trails and have enjoyed riding them, so today decided to change my route, find a couple of shortcuts to Hazlehead and hopefully make it over to Countesswells.

I was well prepared with my running pack – gloves, leggings and a base layer plus water and a snack – very conscious that I need to be self sufficient at all times. The lack of people on the trails today surprised me; certainly at the start of the Hazlehead parkrun course there appeared to be far more people walking on the golf course than anywhere else! It was a pleasant surprise to bump into a familiar face along the way and good to enjoy a socially distanced chat.

Continuing on, I reached Countesswells, my favourite local forest. Knowing that we’re all missing our Sunday runs I enjoyed a leisurely pace and frequent stops to take photos to share.

We have a few points along the route where we’d normally regroup. The selfie spot is where we always have a shared photo! Nobody else in sight today!

I decided against Kingshill as the loop adds a couple of miles and my legs aren’t quite up to that distance at the moment. I clocked up 12 miles overall and that was quite sufficient being my longest run since lockdown.

Running back along the usual route, I enjoyed the swooping trails, reminiscing fondly of previous runs in company. Heading back to the car park I took in a couple of new paths to avoid the main trail, somewhat lumpy and rutted, the result of forestry works prior to lockdown.

The final climb of the day led back up towards Hazlehead. Here I met a familiar Metro man, flying down the track; the opposite of me as I plodded my way back up on increasingly weary legs!

Although there were a couple of rain showers, I was fortunate in being sheltered. The lack of rain saw the trails as dry as I’ve seen.

Round the corner towards the golf course the sun broke through again. Definitely a couple of seasons in one day.

From here, it was pretty much all downhill to home. Mixing things up, I headed along to the halfway point of the Hazlehead parkrun course before turning down towards the park. Staying off road for as long as I could, only in the final mile or so was I back on pavements.

Looking to the Future

A beautiful run and a reminder that friends are never far away! Roll on the day that we can be social on Sunday once again.

Be Grateful of the Small Things

Biking

Today was a stunning day. We’ve been truly blessed with the weather thus far during our ‘confinement’, and it was a joy to be out on the trails again today.

Riding out from home, it’s not long before we reach Hazlehead. I love being able to ride across to Countesswells, a favourite running route ordinarily. I’ve managed to the old ‘stables’ but the full route is a step or two (several miles) too far.

On our social Sunday runs we have regular stops to allow everyone the opportunity to regroup. One such stop is our ‘selfie spot’, so in keeping with tradition Bruce and I have taken pictures there on the couple of occasions we’ve been out.

The solitude of the trails is remarkable with so few people out. The car park closed, people are welcome only if they can get there under their own steam.

Reflections

Home and showered I reflected upon the day thus far and decided to look back on previous years to see what I’d been doing then. Way back in December 2014 I decided to start keeping a journal of things I’m grateful for, noting three positives each day. These are often small, relatively insignificant things but the reflection provides some clear light at the end of each day, all the more so during life’s tough times.

Here they are with some annotations along the way:

15th April 2015

1. Relaxed morning in Keswick (Easter holidays – I wonder if it was raining; ‘relaxed mornings’ don’t usually figure in our hols!)

2. Lovely walk with Bruce & Rob (Rob is one of Bruce’s friends and I recall he’d driven some way to join us for a walk)

3. Post walk beers and chat

15th April 2016

1. Last 3 Wainwrights: Ling Fell, Sale Fell, then on to Binsey! (I should clarify that these were the last 3 Wainwrights of OUR holiday; still a long way to go overall!)

2. Home – although I enjoy being away I’m always happy to be home again.

3. Chat with Mum & Dad

15th April 2017

1. parkrun fun as Run Director

2. Nuart walk around Aberdeen with Bruce followed by a visit to CASC

3. Dinner catch up at Dizzy’s with Elaine, Heidi & Jacq – we need to get together when this is all over, although with one in USA and Dizzy’s sadly no longer standing we’ll need a new venue.

15th April 2018

1. Social run (Quite possibly around the trails we did today)

2. Coffee at Cognito – a post run tradition and a place I’m missing very much right now!

3. Trip to Stonehaven for ice cream – probably Aunty Betty’s; I’ve since discovered E Giulianotti (up the hill from the Square) that does equally good ice cream and has less of a queue!)

15th April 2019

1. Happy boys after the holidays – Easter holidays are a moveable feast. One of the joys of working as a teacher is that the kids are generally happy to return; you can’t fail to be swept up in their enthusiasm.

2. More fudge sold – this was part of my fundraising efforts for the London Marathon last year.

3. Sarah – home to a clean house. I work full-time and am a part-time ‘athlete’. What more can I say?

Have you found any small pleasures during the ‘lockdown’? What are you grateful for?

Social Distancing and Staying Home

Save Lives, Stay At Home

The message from Government has been very clear this week – stay at home. Even work now involves being at home and that’s surprisingly been okay. One upstairs and one downstairs, meeting for coffee or lunch; the day runs pretty much as normal.

Where I’ve struggled a little is with the one form of exercise per day (outside the garden). I’m torn … I’d love to run, but I also feel that for the sake of us both I need to walk with my husband, enjoying some semblance of normality amidst the turmoil of life outside our own little bubble.

Exercise Once A Day

Running has taken a back seat. I envy those that have been able to unearth their seldom used treadmill, previously only used to hang washing or fill the garage. However, I’m being quite pragmatic about this situation. I’ve come through the very brief phases of being upset and angry and have accepted that this is how life is. For the greater good of everyone we’re all making small sacrifices, grateful to those that are making the most impact in society right now – the NHS and everyone else on the frontline be it in our supermarkets and local shops or on the streets supporting with day to day maintenance in essential services such as the often forgotten posties, delivery drivers and refuse collectors. We appreciate you! Stay healthy and safe.

Today I opted to run on a rather beautiful day. Looking ahead we appear to be blessed by a spell of dry weather here in Aberdeen. This makes me happy!

Social Distancing

I contemplated the Deeside Line but decided to assess numbers before going along. There were a few folks walking so I opted for the streets instead.

Daffodils by the Deeside Line

Heading down towards the riverside I ran through the back of the RGU campus, not a soul there, and discovered a wee path along the River Dee that I didn’t know existed. Again, I met a couple of people, stayed well away, and decided to go back onto the pavements, the path too narrow to pass comfortably.

I found myself in Duthie Park having taken the south side path along the river. I was amazed how quiet the park was; it’s very apparent that people are following the ‘rules’.

The park is beautiful right now with flowers in bloom. I enjoyed taking photos as I went, taking pleasure in the small things, something we all need to do right now.

River Dee

Leaving the park I again opted for the south side of the river to make my way home, avoiding the handful of Sunday strollers on the riverside itself.

Stay Positive!

No idea what the week ahead holds, but I’m happy with the way things have gone thus far. There’s so much outwith our control at present that all we can do is focus on the little things. I’ve seen lots of kindness when out today: people smiling, waving from across the road or sharing a friendly word. That’s what is important in life: cherish it.

Solo Sunday: Finding the New ‘Normal’

It’s been a challenging week for everyone. Sunday has always been the social run, Saturday is for parkrun. Neither have happened this week. Yesterday was tough – it was upsetting not being able to go and meet with my running friends; today, however, I’ve got a more positive take on things.

The day started with a phone chat for Mother’s Day. Again, it’s sad not to be able to see my mum and give her a hug. Hopefully that’ll come later in the year. For now Mum, consider yourself virtually hugged!

Out on my run, I opted to take my camera in order to share some of the beauty that unfolded on route. The day was stunning with clear, blue skies, and it was a pleasure to be out in the fresh air. This is the new normal for me: taking even more pleasure in the little things in life and appreciating them fully.

The first joy was the flowers in the garden, beautiful miniature daffodils that have just popped up over the last week.

Mini daffodils

Continuing up the road, there are a few colourful pots outside the local church. I thought of Mum while taking these pictures – virtual flowers to go with the virtual hug!

Up the road I passed by Walker Dam, stopping to say hello to the ducks and seagulls! They were definitely more up for social interaction than any humans I passed today.

Walker Dam, Aberdeen

Passing the Hazlehead parkrun container I smiled – it’s so lovely and bright! A reminder of happy times past and in the future.

Hazlehead parkrun

The trails were quieter than yesterday. Small family groups, some couples, and a few solo runners or walkers only. I love these trails and while sad to not be in the company of friends, I’m grateful to be out; I’m fit, healthy and able to enjoy them.

Turning left where usually we go right: Hazlehead trails

Along to the turning point of parkrun …

I was rather excited to see a little robin bobbing around, pausing to watch it for a while, hoping it would come closer for a photo shoot. Sadly when it did it was more intent on giving a rear view!

Spot the robin!

Out of the woods and across Countesswells Road, I stopped to say hello to the horses.

Further round I cut off on Craigton Road taking a shortcut down the trail to Cults. This used to be a short but fun singletrack section on a biking route we occasionally enjoyed; unfortunately someone decided to build houses and change the track, so unless you fancy playing ‘chicken’ on the bike it’s not quite the same.

Onwards, there’s a wee path along the burn that meanders round the back of the Cults Hotel. Then across North Deeside Road and it’s onto the old Deeside railway line. I was quite delighted to be back onto my old stomping ground. With the dark nights over winter it’s been a while!

Finally, with the need to add on a few more miles I popped up to Johnston Gardens, a beautiful garden and a small haven of peace in the midst of the houses.

An enjoyable run, relaxed pace and taking in the scenery.

Where did you run or walk today? What pleasures have you found this weekend?

What A Difference A Day Makes: Aberdeen parkrun and Scolty Trails

Injury Update

I’m delighted to report that I’m still pain free! My previously mentioned Christmas miracle in the form of a (very expensive) cortisone injection has paid off. I’ve slowly been building the miles up and have now ran around 20 miles a week for a couple of weeks, with no heel pain. Any signs of plantar fasciitis and swelling have gone. A tweak to my orthotic insole (Version 2) courtesy of Shand Podiatry will hopefully ensure that my heel spur is comfortably accommodated and does not cause further issues.

What I have experienced though, with the heel relief, is forefoot pain. Having struggled with pain post-run for a couple of weeks I decided to see to this sooner rather than later. Back to see Scott at Shand Practice,  and a small inexpensive tweak sees orthotic Version 3. I’m very happy to report that’s early indications aware good. I have no forefoot pain after two runs in them, my only gripe being a near blister after 9 miles today. Why did I think it was a good idea to do 9 miles on modified insoles without even a whiff of BodyGlide to ease things along?!

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Aberdeen parkrun

Yesterday should have seen us on a winter skills course. However, there’s been too much weather of late, and thankfully the decision was made to postpone due to 70 mph winds not providing an optimal learning environment.

Instead, I decided to head for Aberdeen parkrun. Driving down I did admittedly have second thoughts as the temperature dropped and the rain became very sleety. However, on reaching the prom the rain was almost off and a group of running friends happened to come along – perfect timing! The wind paled into the background as the chat took over. Turning onto the lower prom it was, as is often the case, an entirely different experience. The wind was gentler and the sky was blue, sun shining down and warning me up nicely. I even contemplated ditching my jacket and gloves, with the knowledge that this was an ‘easy’ parkun, no speed required – I do like a plan.

Waiting for the briefing I saw my sister and niece, offering my niece some of my clothing as she was feeling the cold whole waiting. Hindsight is a great thing: I bet she’d have taken it if she’d known what was ahead. The darkening sky (think black rather than blue) looming across the bridge made me slightly apprehensive so the clothing stayed on.

The Run Director shouted, ‘Go’, and it wasn’t just the parkrunners that started. Very quickly we were being battered by very cold sleet / snowy stuff and a side wind that compounded the biting cold and wind and low temperatures. Most unpleasant!

Having opted to run / walk with my sister, I think we ran more than intended just to keep warm and get it done. We got completely soaked down one side, turned and had the joy of the other side being soaked too. Had my car been anywhere other than the finish I’d have gladly forgone my run credit and bailed.

Then as swiftly as it started, the precipitation ceased and the sky turned back to a beautiful, clear blue once again. Another few miles might have seen us dry, but instead it was shoes off and clean socks on at the door of the Brig O’Don before the post run breakfast and chat.

Scolty: Trail Running with the Metro Ladies

In complete contrast with yesterday’s run, today was glorious for joining some of the Metro ladies for a social run at Scolty. For once in my life I was early, so I opted to run a couple of miles to warm my legs up, bumping into Kirsty (Chief Organiser and Queen of the Trails) midway.

Scolty Trails, Banchory

Back at the car park, we met the other ladies, a small select band with 7 of us in total, and were briefed on our route. Setting off, I was very happy to bimble along at the back. Speed is not my strength at present and the chat was good. As we settled into our paces the gap never grew too big, everyone mindful of the instruction to stop and wait at key junctions.

Metro Aberdeen Running Club: Ladies Trail Run, Scolty Hill

It was a beautiful route, mainly on fire roads, initially heading down and then following the River Dee, before ascending gradually up through the trees to encounter lovely views.

Views from Scolty trails overlooking River Dee

Scolty trails, Banchory
Continuing up, we reached our highest point on the route before a lovely, well earned, descent.

Finally, there was a short ascent to finish and Kirsty guided us up through a narrower path with more underfoot interest, thus taking the mind off any effort involved.

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A fantastic run, thoroughly enjoyable, and great company to boot, ended perfectly on Ride Coffee House in Banchory with carrot cake to die for!

Delicious gluten free carrot cake at Ride Coffee House, Banchory

Roll on the next one! Never mind the route, let’s just make sure the coffee meets the standard set today!

 

 

 

Reflections on 2019: Dreams, Goals and Injury

Goals (and Dreams)

This year I set myself 2 goals:

A marathon PB and a 1st club standard.

I achieved one of them.

A dream came true when I ran the London Marathon, loving every minute of it (despite prior nerves that it might just all be too much).

The plan thereafter had been to recover and then have a strong Autumn season, hopefully chasing down the coveted club standard. Sadly it didn’t happen due to injury, but I did have a rather awesome summer prior to that running the Fife Coastal Path.

We managed a few hills together (and Bruce did quite a few solo) before embarking on the West Highland Way as a wee ‘rest’ in October.

Injuries

Finally after a few months of very little or no running (a whole 10 weeks off) I had my own Christmas miracle in the form of a cortisone injection and, touch wood, will continue running pain free into the new year. I’m four runs in and it’s feeling good so far.

New Goals

There’s a lot of fitness to build back up. For now, I’m loving being able to run once again and enjoying it for what it is. My GFA for London 2020 has been deferred and my goal is to get back to consistent mileage before targeting times.

First up, my parkrun goals: 200 separate volunteer days and 200 parkruns; in that order.

Happy New Year

Here’s hoping that 2020 brings you the opportunity to pursue you dreams and just enough challenge to keep it interesting!