Unfinished business in Ullapool: Eididh nan Clach Geala

Search the walkhighlands website for this munro and you’ll find it as part of the Beinn Dearg circuit. Most commonly done as part of this, it’s the fourth munro of the round, and for us, the one we missed back in 2012. It was Super Saturday of the Olympics, we were novices with regards to this hill walking malarkey, time was knocking on and the route guide suggested care would be required on the descent. With tired legs we decided to leave it, maybe for another time, not realising the magnitude of this decision down the line with one single red pin on the munro map taunting Bruce and meaning a frustratingly long walk for what could have been an extra hour’s walking then.

The original plan for today was to tag on an additional munro, Seana Bhraigh. However, a substantial amount of rain had fallen overnight and navigation looked tricky combining these two routes, so we opted to play it safe.

Waterproofs on, we headed off on a good path, optimistic that the skies were clearing and we’d be in for a fine day. The initial part of the walk was on a good fire road and quick time was made. Although we weren’t gaining a lot in height, we were warming up pretty nicely and before long we stopped to strip off the waterproofs as the rain appeared to have stopped.

Our path continued onto a smaller track, again pretty good, although it started to get wetter underfoot as we headed gradually upwards meeting the earlier rainfall outing off the hill. Unfortunately we also met another shower of rain, and having progressively moved from a light spot to something more persistent, the waterproofs went back on again. Despite this, we concluded our day wasn’t going quite so badly as this poor chap …

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Turning off we had our low point of the day. The Garmin was jumping around, one moment suggesting forwards, the next back, and regular navigation checks were required, all the while the rain getting frustratingly heavier. On the upside we were gaining height gradually and although the single track path was even wetter underfoot and a little stonier all was well.

Branching off to ascend a grassy slope we anticipated the big climb of the day. This turned out to be easy and took us onto the wide shoulder of the hill. Crossing the grass and boulders we found our way to the first cairn. The mist was thick and visibility was restricted so a navigational check was required to ascertain that the true summit cairn was a short walk away.

Summit cairn: Eididh nan Clach Geala

Reaching the true summit we didn’t linger as the weather was pretty horrible still. Misty, drizzly and my hands getting sore from the wind chill, I stopped to put on gloves, nearly requiring assistance as I realised my fingers were no longer functioning properly. This was rectified pretty much instantly, much to my relief and comfort.

Retracing our steps we made good time, stopping for a sandwich. This tasted so much better than it would have done indoors! Not far off the summit the mist finally cleared, albeit briefly at first, allowing us glimpses of the beautiful views we’d otherwise have missed.

Although dry by now the waterproofs stayed on as not nearly as much heat is generated on the descent. It was with great joy that we finally reached the fire road again, safe in the knowledge that we only had a couple of miles left.

A long day – 12 miles and around 6 hours. The question remains, had we known 7 years ago what we know now, would we have changed anything?