Drumnadrochit Holiday Part 2, featuring Bruce’s 200th munro!

Day 5: Sgurr a’Mhaoraich

Heading along the road by Loch Ness we started the day off well! Rosie & Jim’s barge was on Loch Ness! Not convinced I’d like to be on a flat bottomed barge on the loch on a breezy day but then again, Rosie and Jim may well balk at the idea of a munro! Perhaps they’re looking for Nessie!

Heading out the minor road to Loch Quoich, we came upon a herd of heilan’ coos. One of them had managed to navigate their way across the cattle grid so this alerted us to the fact there may be others. They were in no rush to move, standing majestically with either their whole self, head or bum in the road! We discovered the best way to get past them on this single track road was just to drive very slowly towards them, wait for the final haughty look, and then say a silent prayer that on shifting they’d not take their horns along the side of the car! Mercifully they were kind to us on this occasion.

We finally reached our parking spot, the car now covered in cow dung, just in time for a big black rain cloud to appear down the loch. Knowing there was a shower forecast we opted to sit it out in the car. It came to nothing, instead clinging to the loch, so we donned our waterproofs and headed out.

The walk headed up straight away, following the stalkers path. This was a fairly narrow path but provided a clear route which allowed us to gain height fairly quickly. As it steepened, the path began to zigzag easing the effort required and providing brief respite for the legs.

Sgurr a’Mhaoraich, first glimpse from the path up

Heading for the summit of Sgurr a’Mhaoraich, two summits of Sgurr Coire nan Eirichean are crossed. We met ‘Dad and the loon’ coming back as the wind began to pick up a little, and Dad said they’d turned back on the ridge as the loon was getting blasted by the wind too much. Being relatively small he’d ended up on all fours as he was being buffeted. Further on we met a solo walker who told us the ridge was quite exposed and the descent was ‘interesting’. I wonder retrospectively if this was some sort of manly attempt to psych us out as he and Bruce had just shared their munro counts, both due to hit 200 soon, Bruce being one ahead. The rain began, quickly turning to sleet, and we were advised that there was a wee drop we could shelter in a few minutes away.

A ‘pleasure’ of the hills is feeling the elements. There’s nothing that makes you feel closer to the earth than your face being battered by cold rain, sleet, or even hailstones as we enjoyed briefly. This bout was mercifully short-lived as we didn’t really find any real respite from it.

Continuing onwards the summit path, although clear, did look a little daunting with a steep gradient towards the top. Again Bruce assured me I’ve done worse and I declined the car key (in order to walk back slowly if it got too much), instead saying I’d yell if I needed it. Sometimes it is best to avoid temptation!

In the event, the ridge was very short, the drops off were not too dramatic – it would have been more of a roly poly down rather than anything else as the banks were grassy – and the rocky sections were negotiable by following the path around. The only steep bit was at the top and it had foot prints in the muck to guide the way.

All good, we arrived at the summit unscathed. The weather was in our favour once again and we were able to drink in the beautiful views from cairn before heading back the way we’d come.

Summit of Sgurr a’Mhaoraich

Summit view from Sgurr a’Mhaoraich

Similar to the route up, we were between the summits of Sgurr Coire nan Eirichean when the heavens opened once again. This time the shower was prolonged and as we dropped downwards we transitioned from a wee flurry of snow to sleet, hail and rain. Funnily enough, it doesn’t feel so bad when it’s at your back!

Looking back to Gleouraich

In good spirits, happy to have successfully completed another munro and having enjoyed the stunning scenery once again, we made our way back to the car. Chatting to a couple of guys headed for an overnight camp before kayaking over to one of their second last munro summits, we once again timed things to perfection, getting into the car just as another downpour came along.

Passed the coos safely – no less enthusiastic about moving off the road – kit hung up to dry (thanks to our lovely landlady at Greenlea B & B), time for a wee glass of something before dinner calls.

Day 6: Beinn Fhada and A’Ghlas-beinn

Rosie & Jim’s barge was at the end of the loch. It appeared to be anchored there so I’m thinking perhaps they’re either still hot in pursuit of Nessie, or having an adventure at Urquhart Castle.

That aside, today we headed out with a mission ourselves – to claim Bruce’s 200th munro! We headed into Kintail once again, the intention being to combine two single munros into one. This was set to be a long day!

Our first issue came in the form of a road closure. We pulled off at Morvich and found we had to add a mile and a half by walking up the road. Later we realised we could have gotten further by continuing along the main road; hind sight is a great thing! The path up to the first munro was good, albeit it was a few miles in before we started to gain any real height. We had no issues crossing the stream, a welcome relief, and it was a straightforward gradual ascent to the fork in the path leading the way to the two respective summits. Sadly this was only around 400 metres and we’d started pretty much at sea level.

The first munro, Beinn Fhada, saw us head up a zig zagging path before a long walk straight across the plateau to the top. This was boggy in places but there were enough stones to hop across the dubs relatively clean and, more importantly, dry. It was a shame that the cloud thickened at this point as this was Bruce’s 200th munro and he didn’t really get much of a view. A couple of others (and their dog) had reached the summit ahead of us so we had a brief chat, and a wee nip in celebration, before making our way back to the junction.

We were aware that we were on the clock as we’d started after 10:30 am and were likely to run out of daylight. Our headtorches were packed but we hoped to get most of the way without them. We made good time on the descent, passing a couple who had just come from our next target, A’Ghlas-beinn. However, on chatting their timings confirmed our thinking; we weren’t getting back to the car in daylight no matter how much we wished for it!

The temptation had been to head straight across the plateau as it looked like the two munros were connected by a ridge, but the route guides Bruce had read and the contours on the map suggested this may not be the best idea. In the event when we’d made it back to the split in the paths and up to the cairn at the bealach we realised we’d done the right thing. The drop between the two, albeit probably manageable certainly wasn’t for the faint hearted and would necessitate very dry underfoot conditions!

The second munro again had a good path up and this climbed quite steeply through the zig zags. We were happy with this as it meant we were gaining height more quickly. We’d been advised by the couple we’d met that there were a few false summits. The Garmin also kept us up to speed with the altitude which was a blessing as there were a few summits and what felt like a long way between them! The second last of these had an interesting scrambly little bit followed by a steep up (I’m advised this was a ‘chimney’) that was interesting on the way down. We also had a jet thunder past below us in celebration of Bruce having completed munro 200. Not quite the same as the American Thunderbirds flying in formation for my 100th, but we’ll take it all the same.

The summit this time was clear and we got great views, both agreeing that of the two A’Ghlas-beinn was the finest today. We didn’t linger too long, again conscious of the time for getting down, keen to be over the stream and on the flatter path before the fall of darkness.

As previously mentioned, there were a couple of interesting bits to contend with, but on the whole the path was good and we made decent time. We got back across the stream with plenty of light left and it was only in the trees that we started to feel the evening draw in. Headtorches donned, we hot footed it back to the road, delighted to be back in the vicinity of the car.

Finally back, we were so grateful of the chance to sit down! 18.5 miles done, 2 munros, and a very enjoyable week away.

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